Skip navigation
All Places > Institutional Solutions > Blog

It’s in the data: How to pinpoint attrition risk factors

 

Only 59% of students who begin a college career as an undergraduate earn their bachelor’s degree within six years from the same institution where they start their study, according to a recent survey. That means 41% of the students in this pool leave college for one reason or another. In order to combat this statistic and improve retention rates, it’s important to be able to pinpoint attrition risks and face them early on with students, within their freshman year if possible, in order to provide students with the motivation and skills to complete their college degree.

 

Predicting attrition risks

 

While there may be some universal risk factors for attrition that come up regularly in conversations on this topic, it’s important to be able to know for sure what your particular students are confronting that may lead to them leaving college. Are they lacking particular skills needed for success, or are they simply not fitting into college life?

 

Surveying students can be a great option, but it shouldn’t be the sole choice for collecting information, according to Sherry Woosley, Director of Analytics and Research at Skyfactor. “While surveys can be crucial to identifying at-risk students, I would not recommend using only surveys to predict risk.” Other possible options can include tracking data you, as faculty already have access to, such as:

  • Pre-college experiences
  • Enrollment patterns
  • Academic performance
  • Course or campus engagement
  • Financial Aid
  • Utilization of student services

Including these types of additional data can help create the right combination of proven sources instead of relying on just one.

 

How surveys can help

 

Surveys have the potential to highlight areas where students are consistently struggling whether it’s academically or something else. Non-academic issues can be just as debilitating for student success as those connected to coursework and should be addressed by faculty. Things like homesickness, poor study behaviors, and a lack of integration into college life are all possible areas of struggle for students away at college, but how would you know what they’re going through without asking them?

 

Figuring out the best way to utilize survey data to discover risks for attrition may mean relying on outside sources that have better access to a broader data set. Skyfactor has done some of the research for you in this regard, releasing reports related to issues affecting a large section of the student population such as homesickness or overall usage of student services.

 

To see how your specific group of students are doing, Mapworks helps predict risk while looking at the whole student. It provides an early-term snapshot to show who might be most at risk along with the contributing factors. Used each day, you can track the progress of your students and monitor their success closely enough to to institute intervention strategies when necessary, at the earliest stage.

 

Where else to track data

 

Even students not experiencing the issues mentioned above can be at risk for leaving college, which is why it’s important to find data outside of that collected in surveys to evaluate attrition risks. A few other data sources which can help highlight risk factors include:

  • Enrollment patterns
  • Academic performance over time
  • Course engagement
  • Campus engagement
  • Utilization of student services

 

Tracking data from these sources can not only highlight specific areas of risk, but can also tell you at what time of the year these risks occur. Does utilization of student services drop off after the first month or two? Do fewer students enroll in second semester courses? Noting these trends can allow faculty to combat these issues at the right time of year to have a positive effect in decreasing attrition.

 

Attacking the problem head on during orientation

 

Another strategy faculty may want to adopt to mitigate attrition risk is addressing common issues within the first week of the start of class. Ensuring students know what services are available to them for support, fully explaining your expectations for the course, and providing students with the right tools to help them develop the skills they’ll need to succeed are all ways you can support students’ efforts to succeed in college.

 

Teaching your students to have grit is another way to help them begin their college experience on the right foot. Among the tenants of grit is resilience. Instilling in students the ability to recover from whatever challenges they face through focus and effort is perhaps the best coping mechanism you can give them to fight those factors that could lead to leaving college. Prepare students for disappointment, because college doesn’t always live up to expectations, and then show them how to overcome and press forward.


Nearly 1/3 of undergraduate students leave college after their first year, but this statistic can get smaller with the right attention to thoughtfully collected data on attrition risk. This can be achieved by varying the sources for data and then working with students early to address risks and ensure they have the right skillset to succeed.

Nicole Gibbs

Food For Thought Webinars

Posted by Nicole Gibbs Jul 25, 2018

September 7th @ 2:00 PM ET

In the search for and creation of open educational resources (OER), faculty must be aware of copyright and open license protections and uses of materials under the law. All types of works have a license outlining terms or conditions of use. This webinar will review all forms of licensing of published and unpublished works designated all rights reserved, in the public domain, or with a Creative Commons license. We will discuss the rules for distributing, performing, displaying, copying, and/or making derivatives of a work based on its license.

September 11th @ 2:00 PM ET

One of the biggest challenges with assessment data is making sense of it and acting on it. How do we know when results are outstanding or concerning? What if the results are below average? What should our target performance be? Benchmarking can help provide answers to these questions and more! In this webinar, we'll explore what benchmarking is, why campuses would use benchmarking, and different types of benchmarking.

September 14th @ 2:00 PM ET

Clickers can dramatically improve your students’ engagement in the classroom. But, like all teaching tools, there are more and less effective ways of incorporating them into your class. This webinar will include a brief review of the motivations for using clickers, as well as practical guidelines for ensuring their success, including writing effective questions, facilitating student discussion and choosing a grading policy that minimizes stress for you and your students. Enrollment will be limited to ensure all participants have time to ask questions and share experiences.

October 4th @ 2:00 PM ET

Student engagement and affordability are hot topics on most campuses of higher education. In this webinar, Leif Nelson, Director of Learning Technology Solutions at Boise State University, will discuss these important topics, and will share specific examples and initiatives of how Boise State is addressing these challenges to help their students succeed.

October 11th @ 2:00 PM ET

Nursing programs purpose themselves to be accountable to communities of interest—to include the nursing profession, consumers, employers, peer institutions of higher education, students and their families. CCNE accreditation validates the success a nursing program achieved related to mission, goals and outcomes. As nursing faculty and administrators, we have to be able to nimbly understand and communicate our program outcomes based on data we collected and analyzed—we need agility to draw conclusions as to what our communities of interest value and what makes our program unique and effective in fulfilling our mission. Join this webinar to learn how to use internal and external data sources to provide evidence of programmatic assessment plan effectiveness. The speaker will address ways to effectively “tell your success stories” to CCNE site visitors and communities of interest through use of multiple data sources. The audience will be given examples of how relevant data sharing, sculpted to fit specific communities of interest, can optimize and leverage program outcomes.

October 25th @ 2:00 PM ET

Enhance the level of learning in your classroom by asking higher level questions for problem solving, making connections, and peer interaction. This webinar, led by Cindy Albert of the University of Wisconsin--Eau Claire, will provide tips for creating question prompts, as well as how to craft the follow up questions to encourage deeper learning.

November 1st @ 2:00 PM ET

This webinar, hosted by Kathy Roberts of the University of North Texas, presents how they implemented a new student response system--in this case, iClicker Cloud. Ideal for instructional technologists and those working in the departments of teaching and learning, Kathy will present steps (and mis-steps) they experienced along the way to an a successful implementation. This webinar is also well-suited for faculty and deparment heads interested in standardizing on a single student response system.

November 8th @ 2:00 PM ET

A vital component of CAEP accreditation is the need for reliable and valid data to demonstrate continuous program improvement. Part of the requirements, specifically those in standard four of the CAEP accreditation standards, call on teacher education programs to demonstrate not only satisfaction of program completers and employers, but also the preparedness of completers to positively impact student learning. In this webinar, one campus that recently earned CAEP accreditation will highlight how they use a variety of data sources—including national benchmarking assessments of graduating seniors, alumni, and employers—to support CAEP accreditation efforts, benchmark against peer institutions, and drive continuous improvements to their teacher education program.

November 13th @ 2:00 PM ET

Student Response systems are traditionally thought of as in-class tools. And why not? They are great for creating connections, improving student focus, identifying misconceptions, and giving every student a voice. But there are a variety of ways that schools are beginning to use Student Response systems. Dr. Kimi King of the University of North Texas will present some ways that she uses iClicker Cloud (the Student Response System at UNT) in creative, out of the box ways. This presentation is ideal for faculty or administrators interested in adopting a SRS for the institution, and how to maximize that investment.

December 4th @ 2:00 PM ET

Intuitively, we know a lot has changed in higher education over the past ten years, both with our students and our practices, in particular with campus housing. And, we can think of many stories that reflect these changes. But, which of these stories show up in our data, and what in the data surprise us? Using data from the last ten years of the ACUHO-I/Benchworks Resident Assessment, we’ll explore ten key trends from the last ten years in housing.

Early this year, the Association of College and Research Libraries compiled their top 5 articles about open educational resources (OER). The topics of these five posts focus on how libraries can participate in the integration of OER at their school from simply supporting the integration of these resources to becoming more vocal about their availability to actively engaging in OER adoption and authoring. Each of these topics are relevant to today’s librarians as they work toward ensuring they offer beneficial resources to students as well as faculty to make content accessible. According to an article posted on EdSurge, more colleges are setting up support systems to encourage OER adoption, using the campus library as the pitch center for OER. At the University of Texas at Arlington, a full-time Open Education Librarian is employed on staff. A recent project she did to bring OER to the forefront was create a series of videos promoting professors who replaced commercial textbooks in their courses with OER. These videos also addressed common pain points associated with traditional textbooks and how OER can help remedy those issues. Marilyn Billings, the Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Librarian at University of Massachusetts Amherst, spearheads the Open Education Initiative (OEI), a faculty incentive program that encourages the use of OER to support student learning along with the creation of new teaching materials and the use of library subscription materials. The library has a dedicated space on their website for OER and accepts grant proposals which require an anticipated OER implementation date. The importance of the role of the librarian in establishing OERs into curriculum was evaluated in a study done by the Centre for Academic Practice & Learning Enhancement (CAPLE) and Centre for Educational Technology and Interoperability Standards (CETIS), at the University of Strathclyde. This study looked primarily at higher education OER projects worldwide. The main objectives, according to the study, for these projects were:

 

   Implement repository or content management/publishing system for OER release
   Release existing institutional content as OER
   Raise awareness of OER and encourage its use

 

Findings showed that in three out of four project teams, at least one librarian participated, and from those teams, the library was either leading or a partner of the initiative 50 percent of the time. The expertise librarians are able to offer related to content-focused OER initiatives can greatly benefit teams working to create new curriculum or content management processes as their relate to OER. Advocating effectively for faculty to incorporate OER has many benefits for students and educators, but it can also lead to additional responsibilities for librarians when their workload is already full. In the paper, Librarians and OER: Cultivating a Community of Practice to Be More Effective Advocates, librarians in British Columbia, Canada came together as a community (BCOER Librarians) to focus on education and professional development that would help libraries facilitate the use and decampment of OER. Through a monthly, virtual meeting, the librarians in this group share ways to support the use of quality OER by collaborating on ideas, tools and strategies. To date, according to their website, there are 40 institutions participating in OER and students have saved over seven million dollars. In an article from the Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education (ISKME), it’s recommended that librarians integrate open practices and cultivate leaders who can share their knowledge about OER policies and practices. An example of how this works can be seen at Granite State College in New Hampshire where a new Library Media Specialist certification program enables faculty and advisors to integrate open education practice and OER creation and improvement into course creation workflows. Additionally, OER courseware is being utilized for the certificate course itself. Regardless of the educational model being used in conjunction with open content, it’s important to note, says Stephen Downes in Models for Sustainable Open Educational Resources, that the nature of the content must be taken into consideration. Content needs to have longevity, and to do so should be flexible and adaptable to local needs. It also needs to be modifiable and adaptable based on licensing models. Think of content in a local context, how it pertains to your school and to the course it will be used for, and whether it requires changes in order to be relevant and appropriate. With so much discussion going on around OER and effectively utilizing it for academic purposes, there’s no shortage of content around these five key topic areas. The common thread, however, when thinking about how you, as a librarian, can bring OER into the curriculum at your school is collaboration. Connect with your local faculty to gain support, but also see what other schools are doing and how their strategies are working for them.

 

This blog was originally posted on the Intellus Learning website on Monday, April 9, 2018.

Collaboration will yield deeper insight into student behaviors and enable actions designed to lift retention and success rates

 

April 9th, 2018, New York, NY – Macmillan Learning, a premier learning solutions company, today announced a strategic partnership between Skyfactor (formerly EBI MAP-Works) and N2N Services. For more than twenty years, Skyfactor has empowered hundreds of higher education institutions to harness data from the college experience in ways that materially impact retention, persistence, and student success rates. The Skyfactor product suite features two award-winning offerings, the Mapworks student success and retention service, and the Benchworks program assessment instrument. This new collaboration with software integration provider N2N Services will provide tools and API’s that automate data exchanges between Mapworks and Learning Management Systems (LMS) or Student Information Systems (SIS). Through this partnership with N2N, administrators, faculty, and student support staff will have even deeper insight into the lives and behaviors of students, which will enable them to better serve their student populations.

 

 

“Too often information about student performance, financial aid, new student enrollment, and fees are stored in disparate data systems found throughout an institution’s infrastructure. Compartmentalizing data in this way, while typical, can be counterproductive to achieving the type of holistic perspective many higher education institutions are seeking to acquire,” explained Macmillan Learning Institutional General Manager, Craig Bleyer. This is why we are thrilled to work closely with N2N, as this partnership provides customers with a 360-degree view of the student experience, which is integral to the mission of Skyfactor and the expectations from the marketplace.”

 

N2N's Illuminate is a turnkey API integration platform specifically built for the needs of higher education. Illuminate includes modules to build, secure, integrate, and share APIs. The platform can be used for integrations of all types and by any sized institution. Illuminate allows institutional business users to easily connect their systems, whether on premise, hosted, or in the cloud easily and securely.

 

“N2N is pleased to partner with Skyfactor to enable real-time data integration. We’re confident that Skyfactor's student success and retention solutions, powered by N2N’s integration strategy, will provide real-time and interactive solutions needed to support students, faculty, and staff worldwide,” said Kiran Kodithala CEO and founder of N2N Services Inc. “N2N is committed to collaborations, such as with Skyfactor, that have a direct impact on student success and student progress towards graduation.”

 

Institutions who utilize the integrated instance of Skyfactor and N2N will always be able to access real-time student data to leverage throughout interventions and remediation actions, with integration available for use beginning fall 2018.

 

For more information, please contact the Skyfactor sales and customer teams at http://www.skyfactor.com.

 

About N2N:

N2N Services Inc. is a leader in enterprise application and data integration for higher education. N2N’s Illuminate platform is a cloud based SaaS platform providing standards based, turnkey integration enabling organizations to plug-in new SaaS applications in a matter of minutes to meet strategic institution goals. Our API integration platform is used by more than 150 institutions to enable enterprises to meet strategic integration objectives. N2N Services Inc. is based in Atlanta, GA. Learn more about N2N Services Inc. and the Illuminate platform by visiting our website at http://www.illuminateapp.com/

NEW YORK (PRWEB) FEBRUARY 21, 2018

 

Macmillan Learning, a premier educational solutions provider, and Unizin, the non-profit consortium dedicated to advancing access and affordability in higher education, today announced a strategic partnership. iClicker, a Macmillan Learning company, is also included within this partnership. Unizin schools who adopt iClicker will receive access to iClicker’s evolving learning management system integration tools, federated single sign on, institutional attendance tools, and opportunities to collaborate on learning science studies.

 

Via this innovative partnership, Macmillan Learning will offer the breadth of its content and digital portfolio to Unizin’s 25 member universities with inclusive access and preferred pricing models. By offering students access to course materials on day one, learners can access readings and assignments immediately and improve the chances of course success. Programs like Macmillan Learning’s inclusive access program saved students nearly 70% on course materials.

“Getting off to a fast start in course work is critical to student success. We conducted detailed empirical research on more than 2 million students last year, to better understand their behaviors, preferences, and course outcomes. We remain at the forefront of applying user-centered design, learning science, and data-mining to improve student success,” stated Macmillan Learning CEO, Ken Michaels “We share many of these insights with partners like Unizin to underscore our commitment to student achievement.”

 

“We are thrilled to welcome Macmillan Learning to the Unizin ecosystem,” notes Unizin Interim Executive Director, Rob Lowden, “In Macmillan Learning we have found an educational solutions provider that not only delivers excellent content and platforms, but most importantly is committed to sharing and researching outcomes and behavioral data to advance the core mission of teaching and learning.”

 

A family-owned company, Macmillan’s content and services span eBooks, print materials, market-leading digital learning tools, as well as pedagogical and custom services. Faculty at member institutions will have the opportunity to adopt Macmillan Learning eTexts via Unizin’s Engage platform or utilize content via Macmillan platforms such as LaunchPad and Sapling. Through this partnership Unizin and Macmillan will also collaborate to ensure outcomes and behavioral data from Macmillan content and platforms, including iClicker, will be included in the Unizin Data Platform to provide a more complete view of student engagement metrics.

 

“We are very attuned to the total cost of success for students – their investment of time and money, and the opportunity cost. Macmillan Learning & Unizin share a common goal to extend successful learning to as many learners as possible,” commented Macmillan Learning Institutional GM, Craig Bleyer. “With access to Nobel Laureate authors, innovative student engagement tools from iClicker, and effective practice with algorithmic homework software like Sapling, we are committed to building, measuring, and continually improving our products and content to ensure they provide the very best investment in time and money to help each student to achieve their goals.”

 

The collaboration between Macmillan Learning and Unizin will be immediately available to all Unizin member and subscriber institutions, and their combined student population of nearly 1 million learners, including institutions like Colorado State University, Indiana University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 

Elaborating on the partnership further, Macmillan Learning CEO Ken Michaels stated, “Macmillan Learning has always been an affordable destination for learning materials, and on the cutting edge of the industry with the acquisition of startups like Intellus Learning. We are a mission-driven organization with a deep passion for learner success, and we couldn’t be more excited to kick-off this partnership with the Unizin community.”

 

To learn more about Macmillan Learning’s portfolio of products and services, please visit: macmillanlearning.com.

 

About Macmillan Learning:

Macmillan Learning improves lives through learning. Our legacy of excellence in education informs our approach to using user-centered design, learning science, impact research, and data mining to develop world-class content and pioneering products that are empathetic, highly effective, and drive improved outcomes. Through deep partnership with the world’s best researchers, educators, administrators, and developers, we facilitate teaching and learning opportunities that spark student engagement and improve outcomes. We provide educators with tailored solutions designed to inspire curiosity and measure progress. Our commitment to teaching and discovery upholds our mission to improve lives through learning. Macmillan Learning includes both academic and institutional divisions. To learn more, please visit http://www.macmillanlearning.com or see us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIN or join our Macmillan Community.

 

About Macmillan Learning Institutional:

Macmillan Learning Institutional strives to deliver solutions that provide incisive, actionable insights that help empower institutions of higher-education to help their students achieve their full potential. Our institutional solutions are designed to facilitate college affordability, develop more engaged learners and improve graduation, retention and other success measures. Macmillan Learning Institutional solutions include student engagement technologies like iClicker; Intellus Learning, an aggregation platform for open educational resources and academic library assets backed by powerful engagement analytics; as well as a suite of trusted program and institutional assessment and reporting products through Skyfactor (Benchworks and Mapworks). To learn more, please visit: https://www.macmillanlearning.com/Catalog/page/institutional

 

About Unizin:

Unizin, Ltd. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit consortium of 25 leading universities dedicated to promoting affordability, access, and learner success in digital education. Unizin’s interoperable technology ecosystem supports the diverse teaching and learning environments across its member institutions. Unizin solutions promote technology standards, enable integrations, eliminate the learner analytics black box, ensure accessibility of content and data, preserve and promote faculty choice, and support institutional collaboration. Unizin is operated by its member institutions through a Board of Directors. Unizin is headquartered in Austin, Texas.

At $14.99 per student, Intellus Open Courses offer educators the ability to deliver flexible, affordable course materials to students

 

Macmillan Learning announced the upcoming release of Intellus Open Courses, which feature open educational resources (OER) expertly curated by Macmillan Learning subject matter experts and Macmillan Learning’s editorial team, using the Intellus Learning platform. Each course includes a rich package of instructor supplements and on-demand support. Intellus Open Courses make it easy for faculty to find, adopt, and use the highest quality OER resources and deliver a customizable, affordable course to students. Intellus Open Courses enhance open textbooks by sourcing high-quality openly licensed content from a variety of sources and coupling content with editorially-driven pedagogy.

 

"Each Intellus Open Course contains content from open eBooks, under the Creative Commons Attribution license, and instructor resources like PowerPoint slides and test bank questions, as well as other open assets including YouTube videos, optional institutional library content, primary source documents, and more. Our subject matter experts use the power of the Intellus Learning platform to locate the best open content available from the leading OER content providers and package them into a turnkey courses for use by instructors," stated Renee Altier, Vice President of Institutional Strategy.

 

In addition to the expertly curated OER content, Intellus Open Courses include a suite of support services, including learning management system integration, on-demand training and implementation support, instructor supplements, and customization tools. Instructors can access Intellus Learning to customize, reuse, remix, and redistribute their open course content. Licensing data is available for each content item so instructors know which open resources can be modified as well. Instructors can also leverage Intellus Learning's cornerstone engagement analytics at any time to optimize courses to meet learning objectives.

 

“I adopted the Intellus Open Course for my American Government course because I was impressed with the additional assets and capabilities they've built, which make it more than simply an open textbook. With the added features and analytics that the Intellus platform provides, we will not only decrease the cost of course resources for our students, but also positively impact learning without starting completely from scratch,” said Jessica Scarffe, Associate Professor at Allan Hancock College.

 

Sixteen Intellus Open Courses will be launching this spring in general education courses, such as American government, sociology, economics, pre-algebra, psychology, and chemistry, with the first courses going live for review and testing at the beginning of February 2018. Intellus Open Courses support fees are $14.99 per student, per course, and provide ongoing services for instructors and students that include LMS integration, customization tools and services, technical support, and course maintenance. Institutions can license Intellus Open Course and the Intellus Learning platform for students. Alternatively, students can pay course support fees directly through the Macmillan Learning student store. Additionally, recognizing the spirit of open education, students will be able to access and retain all OER material included in Intellus Open Courses on our website.

 

Charles Linsmeier, Vice President, Editorial, at Macmillan Learning noted, “Importantly, adopters of Intellus Open Courses are not limited to a publisher-provided curriculum. Instead, adopters of Intellus Open Courses are encouraged to make these courses their own by taking advantage of the easy-to-use, search and discovery tools for free and open content that Intellus Learning provides.”

 

Intellus Open Courses are part of Macmillan Learning’s commitment to deliver high-quality content at an affordable price for students. Intellus Learning empowers faculty to deliver affordable course solutions with the support and ease of implementation that faculty have come to expect from Macmillan.

 

Read the full press release here.

The road to Open can be winding. We’d like to help.

 

Intellus Learning is proud to announce the launch of our On the Open Road webinar series! Our goal when creating our spring webinar lineup was to create a forum focused on exploring big ideas and issues in the realm of OER, as well as sharing best practices for the use and adoption of open educational resources.

 

Hear from top thought leaders in the OER community covering topics from best practices for implementing OER initiatives, to finding funding sources, to using open educational resources and pedagogy to improve student outcomes. A perfect fit for instructors, administrators, librarians, instructional designers, and CTL staff – you can view the full list of our upcoming webinars below. Check back for additions throughout the coming months here.

 

2/23, 2PM ET Implementing OER: It Takes A Village

from Jonathan Lashley, Senior Instructional Technologist at Boise State University

Calls to adopt and support open educational resources (OER) are on the rise across higher education. Because of the interdisciplinary and often abstract considerations that accompany an institutional embrace of OER, early expectation setting is important for everyone involved. In this first webinar in our On the Open Road series, participants will learn about some of the early planning and ongoing practices that have led to successful university initiatives in OER. [ REGISTER ]

 

3/5, 2PM ET Funding Your OER Initiative

from TJ Bliss, Director of Development and Strategy at Wiki Education

Open Educational Resources are, by definition, free to learners. Still, running an effective OER initiative to get these free resources into the hands of students in a meaningful and pedagogically sound way takes time, energy, and money. In this webinar, TJ Bliss will explore the various ways colleges and universities are financing their successful OER initiatives, including methods for internal funding and an exploration of the external funding landscape. [ REGISTER ]

 

3/7, 2PM ET Going OER: Eliminate Boundaries in Teaching and Learning

from Vera Kennedy, Faculty at West Hills College Lemoore and Lecturer at California State University, Fresno

Faculty are continuously searching for textbooks and materials that fit course requirements and their teaching style. Before the availability of open educational resources (OER), faculty were restricted to commercial publications designed for broad audiences with general theories and concepts across a wide array of topics. Though these resources offer relevant information and supplemental materials, they do not always meet the needs and interests of faculty and students. Adopting and creating free, openly licensed resources (OER) offers faculty the freedom to reuse and remix materials that complement their teaching style and approach based on their discipline training, expertise, and knowledge of their students. In this webinar, faculty will learn about free open educational resources, benefits of going OER, and ideas on their use and application. [ REGISTER ]

 

3/9, 2PM ET Supporting OER: Calling All Instructional Designers and Technologists

from Jonathan Lashley, Senior Instructional Technologist at Boise State University

As the open educational resources (OER) movement matures, questions continue to emerge about how to best support and sustain the use of OER at scale. Instructors and librarians maintain valuable partnerships for managing OER adoption but may need additional assistance when it comes to ensuring ongoing use and (re)development of resources. Instructional designers and technologists, in particular, have the skills, resources, and experience necessary to shepherd sustainable simple OER adoptions into long-term learning innovations. In this webinar in our On the Open Road series, participants will learn how those who support the design, implementation, and technology of teaching and learning on campuses might further expand the potential of OER in higher education. [ REGISTER ]

 

4/13, 2PM ET Valuing OER: From Student Affordability to Meaningful Learning Opportunities

from Jonathan Lashley, Senior Instructional Technologist at Boise State University

Many instructors have embraced Open Educational Resources (OER) as a way to take charge in addressing the rising expenses that their students bear en route to a college degree. Framing the value of OER around textbook cost, however, is only recognizing one of the qualities that make OER such a valuable innovation. In this webinar in our On the Open Road series, participants will learn how OER may sponsor new pedagogical strategies, dynamic learning environments, and improved student outcomes. [ REGISTER ]

 

View all upcoming webinars and register here.
This blog was originally published on the Intellus Learning website.