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2019

Several classic works on college student development emphasize the importance of interactions to student development, learning, and success. To that end, many institutions put significant effort and resources towards efforts to help students build positive peers connections. Intuitively, higher education professionals understand the importance of positive peer connections. However, it is crucial to highlight data and research to back up these stories and theories. This note explores peer connections in first-year college students using responses from a national survey of over 25,000 first-year college students from nearly 30 institutions in the United States.

 

Key Questions:

  1. To what degree did first-year students report making connections with peers?
  2. Were there differences in peer connections across different populations?
  3. How did peer connections relate to the first-year student experience?

 

The concept of homesickness in college students has likely been around for as long as students have been leaving home to go to college. However, there are no universally accepted definitions. Few measures of homesickness in college students exist. Little research has been conducted connecting homesickness directly to the experiences of college students and their academic success, and those that have been done are typically limited to a single campus. This note explores the concept of homesickness in college students using response from a national survey of over 25,000 first-year college students from nearly 30 institutions in the United States.

 

Key Questions:

  1. What is homesickness?
  2. How prevalent is homesickness in first-year students?
  3. How is homesickness related to the first-year student experience?

 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that between 2016 and 2026, overall employment of advanced nurse practitioners will increase by about 31%. The aging population in the United States as well as an emphasis on preventative care have created greater demand for nurse practitioners with advanced degrees.

 

Given the crucial nature of the work these professionals do, it is important to understand how a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program contributes to the high-level mastery of skills essential in the medical field. This research note details findings from a national dataset constructed from the AACN/Benchworks MSN Exit Assessment of over 8,000 MSN students from nearly 150 colleges and universities in the United States. In particular, this research notes explores the relationship between overall learning, student characteristics, and various components of the MSN student experience.

 

Key Questions:

  1. Who are our MSN program graduates?
  2. How do graduating MSN students rate their overall experience?
  3. Which learning factors relate to overall learning in MSN programs?
  4. Which satisfaction factors relate to overall learning in MSN programs?