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18 Posts authored by: Sara Jo Lee
Sara Jo Lee

iClicker Cloud Training

Posted by Sara Jo Lee Apr 3, 2020
ON-DEMAND

iClicker Learning Solutions Specialist Alana Craig hosts a special iClicker Cloud instructor training webinar, which covers the nuts and bolts of setting up your iClicker Cloud account and course, downloading the software, and using the software for polling, quizzing, and attendance in a virtual classroom.

Access the recording today!

Last week, Skyfactor Benchworks, a Macmillan Learning Company that provides research-based program benchmarking and assessments to help colleges identify areas of improvement, announced the winners of its first, annual Assessment and Impact Awards for Nursing Education. The award was created to highlight schools of nursing that are successfully using data to improve their programs, helping to retain students and developing more practice-ready nursing professionals.

 

The four institutions selected to be the inaugural Assessment and Impact Award for Nursing were: Bloomfield College, Colorado Technical University, Rowan University and Seton Hall University. The winners were selected using Benchworks multi-step evaluation process that included an analysis of multi-year assessment data that identified programs that either had the best results or best increases in performance in areas like course interactions and quality of instruction, as well as interviews and with nursing program administrators by members of the Benchworks Analytics and Research Team.

 

For those who teach in a classroom, the positive benefits of engaging and participating in class are apparent. Both in research and in practice, classroom engagement has previously been shown to increase both motivation and learning by better connecting them to the classroom experience in order to support academic success. But, how does class participation relate to the broader first year student experience?

 

This note explores class participation in first-year college students using responses from a national survey of over 25,000 first-year college students from nearly 30 institutions in the United States.

 

Several classic works on college student development emphasize the importance of interactions to student development, learning, and success. To that end, many institutions put significant effort and resources towards efforts to help students build positive peers connections. Intuitively, higher education professionals understand the importance of positive peer connections. However, it is crucial to highlight data and research to back up these stories and theories. This note explores peer connections in first-year college students using responses from a national survey of over 25,000 first-year college students from nearly 30 institutions in the United States.

 

Key Questions:

  1. To what degree did first-year students report making connections with peers?
  2. Were there differences in peer connections across different populations?
  3. How did peer connections relate to the first-year student experience?

 

The concept of homesickness in college students has likely been around for as long as students have been leaving home to go to college. However, there are no universally accepted definitions. Few measures of homesickness in college students exist. Little research has been conducted connecting homesickness directly to the experiences of college students and their academic success, and those that have been done are typically limited to a single campus. This note explores the concept of homesickness in college students using response from a national survey of over 25,000 first-year college students from nearly 30 institutions in the United States.

 

Key Questions:

  1. What is homesickness?
  2. How prevalent is homesickness in first-year students?
  3. How is homesickness related to the first-year student experience?

 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that between 2016 and 2026, overall employment of advanced nurse practitioners will increase by about 31%. The aging population in the United States as well as an emphasis on preventative care have created greater demand for nurse practitioners with advanced degrees.

 

Given the crucial nature of the work these professionals do, it is important to understand how a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program contributes to the high-level mastery of skills essential in the medical field. This research note details findings from a national dataset constructed from the AACN/Benchworks MSN Exit Assessment of over 8,000 MSN students from nearly 150 colleges and universities in the United States. In particular, this research notes explores the relationship between overall learning, student characteristics, and various components of the MSN student experience.

 

Key Questions:

  1. Who are our MSN program graduates?
  2. How do graduating MSN students rate their overall experience?
  3. Which learning factors relate to overall learning in MSN programs?
  4. Which satisfaction factors relate to overall learning in MSN programs?

 

Benchmarking is one of many powerful tools that can be used by higher education professionals to make sense of survey results. Benchmarking is the practice of making comparisons in order to drive continuous improvement. To some, using a benchmarking survey is a challenging and complicated endeavor. However, benchmarking doesn’t have to be scary. Read on for more information about benchmarking surveys, why they are valuable, and tips for working them into your assessment toolbox!

 

Sara Jo Lee

Nursing Education

Posted by Sara Jo Lee Nov 30, 2018

For almost two decades, in effort to evaluate (and therefore strengthen programming) as well as support accreditation, Skyfactor Benchworks in partnership with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) created assessments to measure the effectiveness of certain program elements from the student perspective.1

 

The findings from this assessment allowed for an exploration of how nursing programs influence and contribute to learning outcomes related to professional values, core competencies, technical skills, core knowledge, and role development.

 

Professional Values

In response to demonstrating accountability in areas such as advocacy for vulnerable patients, fairness in the delivery of care, honoring the rights of patients, and delivering culturally competent care, at least 75% of the students reported this as being taught at “moderate” or “large” extent.2

 

Core Competencies

At least 67% of students indicated the nursing program taught them to apply research-based knowledge as a basis for practice, to assist patients in understanding/interpreting the meaning of health information as well as correctly evaluating a patient’s ability to assume the responsibility of self-care. 60% of students reported that the program taught them to make effective presentations.

 

Technical Skills

80% of students indicated they gained technical skills related to assessing vital signs and applying infection control measures from the nursing program. Approximately 75% reported being taught skills related to providing pain reduction measures and medication administration by all routes. Related to those, 60% and approximately 67% of students indicated being taught to manage wounds and provide emotional support in preparation for therapeutic procedures, respectively.

 

Respondents were divided into groups by previous healthcare experience before entering the nursing program: less than one year, 1-4 years, more than 4 years. When analyzing responses, the differences in professional value and core competencies were statistically significant but small. The biggest difference was in technical skills with respondents entering the nursing program with less than four years of healthcare experience being more likely than other respondents to indicate that the nursing program taught them technical skills such as assessing vital signs and applying infection control measures. There are also significant and important differences among degree programs as it relates to learning outcomes. In a comparison of BSN, RN, and Accelerated programs, respondents from the Accelerated program were far less likely to indicate being taught learning outcomes related to professional values, core competencies, and technical skills than respondents completing BSN and RN relationships. To drill down further, while the percentages of BSN and RN completion respondents indicated their program had taught them learning outcomes related to professional values and core competencies, RN completion respondents were significantly less likely than BSN respondents to report their program had taught them to assess vital signs, apply infection control measures, provide pain medication measures, and administer medications by all routes.

 

Core Knowledge

At least 65% of students reported that the nursing program taught them to apply an ethical, decision-making framework to clinical situations and to assess predictive factors that influence the health of patients; and 60% reported being taught to use appropriate technologies to assess patients, communicate with healthcare professionals to deliver high-quality patient care, and understand the effects of health policies on diverse populations (with an understanding of the global healthcare environment).

 

Role Development

The majority of respondents reported that they were taught the idea of lifelong learning in support of excellence in nursing practice. More than 60% indicated they were taught to incorporate nursing standards into practice, integrate theory to develop a foundation for practice, and delegate nursing care while retaining accountability.

 

As was the case of technical skills, previous healthcare experience impacted the degree to which students indicated the nursing program taught key core knowledge and role development learning outcomes. Students with four or more years of previous healthcare experience were more likely to report on being largely taught learning outcomes outside of technical skills to a large degree such as: understanding the effects of healthcare policies on diverse populations (73%), assisting patients to achieve a peaceful end of life (71%), understanding how healthcare delivery systems are organized and the global healthcare environment, and incorporate knowledge of cost factors when delivering care. Along with reporting a higher value on life-long learning, respondents indicated being taught to integrate theories and concepts from liberal education into nursing practice and delegating nursing care while retaining accountability.

 

There were also notable differences between degree programs as it related to learning outcomes with significantly fewer respondents from Accelerated nursing programs indicating that they were taught learning outcomes related to core knowledge than BSN and RN completion respondents.

 

Overall, the majority of student respondents indicated the nursing program (regardless of program or previous healthcare experience) had taught them to achieve a variety of key learning outcomes related to professional values, core competencies, and technical skills.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________

1. Skyfactor Benchmarks, in partnership with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), created the Nursing Education Assessments to measure the effectiveness of programs from the student’s perspective. During the 2013-2014 academic year, 24,793 students participated in the undergraduate assessment.

2. All percentages reported here indicate responses of “moderate” and “large” extent.

Macmillan Learning remains committed to helping all users enjoy equal access to our digital learning solutions. We put accessibility, information security and user privacy at the forefront of our product development and marketing practices. Check out our VP of Information Security & Privacy, Stephen Davis, discussing our commitment to accessibility, security and respect of our users' privacy.

 

Owing to the immense responsibilities entrusted to teachers, teacher education programs are tasked with setting a curriculum that prepares students for the challenges and rigors of professional teaching. Administrators must identify which components of the program are most effective, which are not as effective, and refocus their efforts accordingly. Data from the 2017-2018 Benchworks Teacher Education Exit survey provides program administrators with valuable insight into students’ overall learning and the aspects of the program that contribute to it.

 

This research note details findings from the Benchworks Teacher Education Exit Assessment of over 2,500 graduating teacher education students from 21 colleges and universities in the United States. In particular, this research notes explores concepts—both learning and satisfaction—that relate to overall learning as a result of the teacher education program experience.

 

Key Questions:

  1. Who are our teacher education program graduates?
  2. How do graduating teacher education students rate their overall experience?
  3. Which learning factors relate to overall learning in teacher education programs?
  4. Which satisfaction factors relate to overall learning in teacher education programs?

Student staff members—commonly known as resident assistants or community assistants—support primary functions in our residence halls, facilitate community development, and provide learning opportunities to residents. For a position so critical to residence life, in particular one that continues to evolve and grow, it is imperative that we understand the current experience of our student staff, what they learn, and how important quality student staff members are to the broader college student experience. However, even with all of this research and our anecdotal understanding of the importance of the position, little empirical research exists on what RAs gain from their experience and how quality RAs relate to the overall housing experience of residents. Furthermore, what research does exist is often limited to single-campus studies or qualitative research.

 

This research note details findings from the ACUHO-I/Benchworks Student Staff Assessment, specifically a sample of over 3,000 student staff from 43 institutions. In particular, this research notes explores the relationship between the student staff member experience and their intent to return to their positions in the following academic year.

 

Key Questions:

  1. How many student staff members intend to return to their positions?
  2. What aspects of the student staff experience are most closely related to intent to return?

 

Student staff members—commonly known as resident assistants or community assistants—support key operations in our residence halls, facilitate community development, and provide learning opportunities to residents. For a position so critical to residence life, in particular one that continues to evolve and grow, it is imperative that we understand the current experience of our student staff, what they learn, and how important quality student staff members are to the broader college student experience. However, even with all of this research and our anecdotal understanding of the importance of the position, little empirical research exists on what RAs gain from their experience and how quality RAs relate to the overall housing experience of residents. Furthermore, what research does exist is often limited to single-campus studies or qualitative research.

 

This research note details findings from the ACUHO-I/Benchworks Student Staff Assessment, specifically a sample of over 3,000 student staff from 43 institutions. In particular, this research notes explores which concepts most closely relate to a quality student staff experience

 

Key Questions:

  1. Who are our student staff?
  2. How satisfied were student staff with their overall experience?
  3. What concepts related to high perceptions of the student staff experience?

 

 

At Intellus Learning, we are so excited and proud to be working with the American Public University System. Let's continue to reduce the cost of higher education through affordable course materials. 

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Have you ever felt like there weren’t enough hours in the day? With the start of the fall term upon us, it’s very likely you may be feeling that way now! For faculty, administrators, and students alike, the beginning of the school year marks a time of renewal, filled with emotions ranging from excitement to anxiety. At Macmillan Learning, we’re humbled to work with all stakeholders in the education community to help learners achieve their wildest dreams.

Today we are excited to announce a contest to capture the realities, challenges, and motivations of higher education faculty, staff, and students. Through original and captivating video or essay, communicate “What drives you to #AchieveMore?” We talk to faculty and students every day, and often hear incredible stories about perseverance and the determination to succeed. We want to hear more of your stories and will reward the most creative storytellers!

“Each day we hear stories of people who have dedicated themselves to the pursuit of higher education and those who work to support and encourage others in that pursuit,” said Ken Michaels, CEO of Macmillan Learning. “So we are really excited to facilitate the storytelling process and hopefully inspire the next generation of teachers and learners while at it.”

The contest, open to any student, faculty, staff person, or administrator over the age of 18 at an accredited college or university in the United States, runs from August 27th, 2018, to November 2nd, 2018. Submissions will be reviewed from November 2nd to November 30th, 2018 and evaluated based on relevancy, authenticity, organization creativity, and tone.  Three winners in each category will be announced on December 14, 2018, on the competition website: https://go.macmillanlearning.com/driven-to-achieve-more.html. First place winners in each category will receive $500, second place winners in each category will receive $250, and third place winners will receive win $100.

Full contest details can be found at:  https://go.macmillanlearning.com/driven-to-achieve-more.html.

Sara Jo Lee

BLOG | OER in the News

Posted by Sara Jo Lee Aug 17, 2018

It’s an exciting time to be exploring Open Educational Resources (OER), and we wanted to share some great articles that recently caught our eye: