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5 Posts authored by: Thomas Acox Employee

Originally posted on June 6, 2011.

 

May 9, 2011- Tyler Cowen shows us through economics that we may not be as innovative as we think we are and urges us to change.

Originally posted on February 10, 2011.

 

Alex Tabarrok’s PowerPoints from his recent talk on the ‘Invisible Hand’ can be found here.

 

Tyler Cowen’s PowerPoints on ‘Teaching Macroeconomics in Turbulent Times’ can be found here.

Originally posted on March 22, 2011.

 

With streams and rivers drying up because of over-usage, Rob Harmon has implemented a market mechanism to bring back the water. Farmers and beer companies find their fates intertwined in the intriguing century-old tale of Prickly Pear Creek.

 

Inevitably, students’ ears will perk up at the mention of beer and brewers…

 

Check out the video below for a great application of the importance of markets aligning self-interest with social interest.                                                                

 

                                                                             

 

Thanks to Chuck Sicotte for the pointer.

Originally posted on January 25, 2012.

 

Here is Angela Dills via Learn Liberty touching on the high points in a case for school choice. This could lend to a class discussion of how competition provides incentives.

 

                                                                              

Originally posted on September 12, 2012.

 

Via The Globe and Mail Tyler Cowen answers a varierty of questions.  Here is an excerpt:

What sectors will lead the next great boom?

 

Artificial intelligence [AI] will be a significant breakthrough. There are new developments almost every day. Cheaper fossil fuels, particularly natural gas, will spur short-run growth. And an increasing share of national income will go to capital and high productivity. It may not feel like an end to stagnation for many workers, but in terms of aggregate output, the U.S., Canada and Mexico are poised to do extremely well. Mexico will find its way around the drug problems and become more integrated into the U.S. economy. It’s the great underrated nation in the world right now.

 

Can advances in AI create great numbers of jobs?

 

No. A lot of people will be hurt by it. Owners of intellectual property, and capital and manufacturing plants will do very well. Output will go up a lot. But in many areas, wages will fall and jobs will disappear. So the U.S. trend – falling labour force participating rates – will continue. But people who get quality education will be better off.