• Cardiac Arrest and the Conscious Experience of Death

      “Death is reversible.” So began NYU medical center’s director of Critical Care and Resuscitation Research Science, Sam Parnia, at a recent research consultation on people’s death experi...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Chronotype and disease: Correlation still doesn't mean causation

    One of the perennial challenges in teaching Intro Psych is helping students understand that knowing that two variables are, say, positively correlated does not tell us anything about what causes that relationship. Dis...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Our Differences Seize Our Attention, Define Our Identity, and Sometimes Deceive Us

    “Self-consciousness [exists] in contrast with an ‘other,’ a something which is not the self.” ——C. S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain, 1940   We are, always and everywhere, self-co...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Experiments: Practice identifying independent and dependent variables

    Psychology students often struggle with the difference between the independent and dependent variables. After covering these concepts, ask students to work in pairs or small groups to identify both the independent var...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Phone distractions in a crosswalk: An observational research experience for your students

    No, your students will not be texting or talking/listening to a phone in a crosswalk! Instead, they will be observing others who are.   A recent study (Alsaleh, Sayed, & Zaki, 2018)* found that people who we...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Do Near-Death Experiences Reveal That Mind Can Separate From (and Survive) the Body?

    It’s well-established that: brain cells survive for a time after cardiac arrest and even after declared death. some people have been resuscitated after cardiac arrest— even hours after, if they were link...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • The Power of Habit

    On the same day last week, two kind colleagues sent unsolicited photos. In one, taken 21 years ago at Furman University, I am with my esteemed friend/encourager/adviser, Charles Brewer (who sadly died recently).  ...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • No, we really can't multitask: A demo

    As if cell phone use in cars isn’t bad enough, car manufacturers are building distractions into our automobiles, which I affectionately call Built-in Automotive Driving Distraction SystemsTM.   Automakers n...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Talking about stress? Talk about smartphones

    I confess that for many years in my Intro Psych course I didn’t cover sleep or stress. In retrospect, I’m sorry that I didn’t use that opportunity to give those students that information they could u...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Some driving-while-drowsy questions for your next sleep lecture

    A couple weeks ago we were walking our dogs past our neighbor’s house when we noticed that there was a smashed car parked out front. We asked our neighbor what happened. “My son fell asleep. He’s oka...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Why Robots Can't Play Tennis: A New Consciousness Signature

    Originally posted on May 20, 2014.   Three years ago, I gained a new appreciation of consciousness. My mom had an accident that caused her brain to bleed. It seemed to rip away her consciousness. As I slept next ...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Why You Should Be a Mindful Eater

    Originally posted on June 19, 2014.   We’ve all experienced the pleasure and subsequent pain of mindless eating. Just sit in front of the TV, open a bag of chips, and watch your favorite show. Now do the sa...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Do You Know Attractiveness When You See It?

    Originally posted on August 28, 2014.   When your friend tells you about her terrific first date, you will eventually ask the question. You might stall by inquiring about the food she ate, the jokes he told, and ...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Why Do We Sleep?

    Originally posted on May 12, 2014.   Sleep consumes time we could spend foraging and it exposes us to predators.  It’s a waste and a risk.  So why do humans sleep?  Why didn’t nature de...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • If Consciousness Arrives Late to the Decision-Making Party, Is Free Will an Illusion?

    Originally posted on July 1, 2014.   In all of recent psychological science, there has been, to my mind, no more provocative studies those by Benjamin Libet.  His experiments have seemingly shown that when ...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Distinctivenss Defines Identity

    Originally posted on November 4, 2015.   Writing in the August, 2015, Scottish Banner, University of Dundee historian Murray Watson puzzled over having “failed to find a satisfactory answer” for why ...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Who Thinks Our Thoughts

    Originally posted on January 22, 2016.   At the invitation of Princeton University Press, I have just read a fascinating forthcoming book, Stranger in the Mirror: The Scientific Search for the Self, by Fresno St...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Intro Psych T-shirts: Part 1

    When I first started teaching, not as a grad student, but as real live instructor out on my own, I was 24 years old. I was a part-time instructor at a community college near Kansas City. Thinking I had to look the par...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Intro Psych T-shirts: Part 2

    Last week I wrote about how it is I came to wear psychology-related t-shirts to my Intro Psych classes. That post included nine t-shirts. [Read that post.] This week I have ten to share.     Vision –...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Social issues in the classroom: Ideas for activities

    As a psychology instructor it is clear to you the myriad ways in which psychology can be used to both understand social issues and speak to solutions. In fact, the APA Guidelines for the Major (2013; see below) encour...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz