• Example: Observational learning and pretend play

    It can be an eye-opener for a parent when their child starts to mimic their behavior in the form of pretend play. Even more so when what is being portrayed is pre-divorce arguments and the stand-ins are Mary, Joseph, ...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • "Is this classical or operant conditiong?" Practice for your students

    “A cat comes running at the sound of the can opener, that’s classical conditioning, right?” No, no it is not. “Remember,” you say to the student who asks this question, “classical c...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Learning Tips for Students

    What can students do to efficiently learn and remember? Cognitive science offers answers, say Adam Putnam, Victor Sungkhasettee, and Henry Roediger in their new essay, “Optimizing Learning in College.” The...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Can Taking Tests Make Us Smarter?

    Originally posted on August 26, 2014.   In a recent New York Times essay (here), Henry Roediger explains the insights gleaned from his research on “the testing effect”— the enhanced memory that ...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • The Plight of the Super Smart: The Hidden At-Risk Students

    Originally posted on April 5, 2014.   Each year, the American government spends billions of dollars to help students who struggle to meet their potential. These students languish in traditional school programs. ...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • What is the Hardest Part About Going to Mars?

    Originally posted on May 5, 2014.   From an early age, I wanted to be an astronaut. I memorized Mercury astronaut missions. I dreamt of using a manned maneurvering unit to glide through space. I cried when the Ch...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Does Repetition Make Memories Bland?

    Originally posted on July 17, 2014.   Lloyd Cosgrove was his town’s city manager, butcher, and Presbyterian minister. He had a shiny head, bushy eyebrows, and a whooping laugh. If you want Lloyd to remain u...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • The Power of High a Five

    Originally posted on October 16, 2014.   One of my earliest memories is my dad giving me a high five. He was training for a marathon and agreed to take me, his talkative four year-old, on a run. I ran an entire m...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Why Might Pacifiers Get in the Way of Understanding Your Child?

    Originally posted on October 23, 2014.   No matter how many babies I meet, I’m always left wondering what they want. Does a short squeak followed by a shrill squeal signal that the baby is hungry? That I le...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Why Failure is the Best Teacher

    Originally posted on November 13, 2014.   Success is mystery. What is it? How do we achieve it? And why does it often fail to live up our expectations? Success puzzles us because we don’t appreciate failure...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Are Smartphones Making Our Thumbs Smarter?

    Originally posted on February 5, 2015.   Even though the smartphone has only been around for the past seven or eight years, it’s sometimes difficult to remember what life was like before we had so much info...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • How Your Brain Makes Reading Easy

    Originally posted on April 16, 2015.   Our brains are amazing. I am endlessly fascinated by how the brain works. In nearly every interview I do, the reporter asks, “What part of the brain lights up when tha...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Hero rats: Trained to detect landmines and tuberculosis

    At the 2016 Stanford Psych One Conference, Linda Woolf (Webster University) suggested that during the Intro Psych learning chapter we talk about Hero Rats. This is a very nice way to help students see an example of th...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Crisis or Common Sense? Two Ways to Approach Scientific Replication

    Originally posted on September 24, 2015.   This past weekend, I gave myself an odd birthday present. I entered an ultramarathon. If you’ve read my posts, you know I like to run. For my birthday, I wanted to...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Is the SAT Educationally and Socially Valid?

    Originally posted on April 22, 2014.   Critics have used the SAT test redesign to denounce the SAT and aptitude testing.  The multiple choice SAT has “never been a good predictor of academic achievemen...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Longhand vs. Laptop Note Taking—A Good Reason to Ban Laptops in Classrooms?

    Originally posted on May 2, 2014.   Many faculty fret over students’ in-class use of computers—ostensibly there for note taking, but often also used for distracting e-mail, messaging, and checking soc...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Want to Become More Focused and Production?

    Originally posted on September 5, 2014.   Feeling stressed by multiple demands for your time and attention?  Daniel Levitin, director of McGill University’s Laboratory for Music, Cognition and Expertis...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • From Beijing: Academic Enthusiasm!

    Originally posted on November 11, 2014.   A  recent Beijing visit left me marveling at students’ academic enthusiasm.  In explaining Asian students’ outperformance of North American student...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Does Music Help Memory?

    Originally posted on March 4, 2015.   When was the last time you studied without distractions? Or did any one activity without simultaneously doing another?   Multitasking pops up everywhere. While we work...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Experiencing a Virtual World

    Originally posted on March 25, 2015.   During a recent visit to Stanford University, psychologist Jeremy Bailenson (pictured) invited our small group of conferees to his Virtual Human Interaction Lab, where he e...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers