• Resources for studying and teaching the brain

    Shout out to the Society for the Teaching of Psychology Facebook group for sharing their favorite tools for helping students study the brain.   Printable black and white images of the brain from Clipart Library ...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Machine Learning Meets Psychological Science

    At long last, artificial intelligence (AI)—and its main subset, machine learning—is beginning to fulfill its promise. When fed massive amounts of data, computers can discern patterns (as in speech recognit...
    David Myers
    created by David Myers
  • The intelligence of crows: A short writing assignment 

    Crows are smart. Never underestimate a crow.   Comparative psychology is “the study of nonhuman animal behavior with the dual objective of understanding the behavior for its own sake and furthering the und...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Happy Gut, Happy Brain? Truth and Hype in the New Gut–Brain Research

    Psychological science delights us with its occasional surprises. For example, who would have imagined that electroconvulsive therapy—shocking the brain into mild convulsions—would often be an effective an...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Do Near-Death Experiences Reveal That Mind Can Separate From (and Survive) the Body?

    It’s well-established that: brain cells survive for a time after cardiac arrest and even after declared death. some people have been resuscitated after cardiac arrest— even hours after, if they were link...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Genetics: More complex than we are told

    While it had been common for astronauts to spend six months at the ISS, NASA wanted to know what happens when humans spend even longer in space. Depending on the orbit trajectory chosen – which depends on how mu...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • What Parents Come to Understand about the Heritability of Behavior

    Long ago, I read a jest that most people believe in the shaping power of environmental nurture—until they have their second child.   That pretty well sums up the results of a not-yet-published survey of 1...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Would you risk CTE for your family?

    A young man, raising funds for his high school football team, knocked on the door of a Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) researcher. And not just any CTE researcher: a CTE researcher who looks specifically at tee...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Seeing faces in toast and the fusiform face area

    Apophenia is seeing patterns in randomness, which may be the mechanism behind conspiracy theory generation. If it feels to me like a set of random events are connected and no one is talking about the connection, then ...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • The neuroscience behind naloxone

    A couple months ago I wrote a suggestion on how to incorporate coverage of the opioid epidemic into Intro Psych (Frantz, 2017). There I put it in the context of the availability heuristic. Here I will suggest cov...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Is Our Past Experience "All There?"

    If the hardiest weed in our cognitive neuroscience garden is that “we only use 10 percent of our brains,” the next hardiest weed is this myth: “All our past experience is ‘in there’ and p...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Psychology Community Webinar: "Happiness: What Your Mother Didn’t Tell You"

    3/2/17 1:00 PM
    Register for the WebEx here!   If prompted for a password: gilbert PRESENTED BY Daniel Gilbert  ABOUT THE SYMPOSIUM   Most of us think we know what would make us happy and that our only problem is ...
    Morgan Ratner
    last modified by Morgan Ratner
    Psychology Community Webinar: "Happiness: What Your Mother Didn’t Tell You"
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  • How many of my friends believe the 10% brain myth? A classroom activity

    Here’s a quick (seven minutes!) and engaging way to start your brain lecture. Annette Jordan Nielsen (Woods Cross High School in Bountiful, UT) harnesses her students’ connections to gather a little data. ...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Can “Brain Training” Protect us from Mental Decline and Dementia?

    Originally posted on August 2, 2016.   News flash . . . from the current New Yorker (July 24, 2016), Wall Street Journal (July 25, 2016), and Time (August 8, 2016) . . . “In the most rigorous stu...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • The Brain’s Amazing Plasticity

    Originally posted on August 16, 2016.   In Psychology, 11th Edition, Nathan DeWall and I illustrate brain plasticity with a 6-year-old girl who had most of her right hemisphere removed to end life-threatening se...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • New in the APS Observer: Nathan on Brain Size, David on Vocational Interests

    Originally posted on September 23, 2014.   In the September Observer (from the Association for Psychological Science), Nathan explains why “Brain Size Matters.”  He summarizes, and suggests how t...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • New in the APS Observer: Nathan on Growing New Neurons, and Dave on "A Good Word for Self-Esteem"

    Originally posted on December 16, 2014.   The December APS Observer is out with an essay by Nathan on “The Neural Greenhouse:  Teaching Students How to Grow Neurons and Keep Them Alive.” Our brai...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Why Are Adolescents the Forgotten Among the Brain Injured?

    Originally posted on May 7, 2014.   The Iran and Afghanistan Wars introduced a new and troubling picture on the relationship between traumatic brain injury and mental health. Multiple deployments exposed soldiers...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Why Robots Can't Play Tennis: A New Consciousness Signature

    Originally posted on May 20, 2014.   Three years ago, I gained a new appreciation of consciousness. My mom had an accident that caused her brain to bleed. It seemed to rip away her consciousness. As I slept next ...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall
  • Will the Real Phineas Gage Please Step Forward?

    Originally posted on May 27, 2014.   Psychology is ripe with history. Unlike many sciences, psychology grips us because we are its main characters. People have more experience with quarrels than with quarks. But ...
    Nathan DeWall
    last modified by Nathan DeWall