• Some Amazing Data/Teaching Resources

    Bill Gates wants people he hires to read two of his favorite books: The Better Angels of Our Nature, by psychologist Steven Pinker, and Factfulness by the late Hans Rosling.   I, too, have loved these books, wh...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Cardiac Arrest and the Conscious Experience of Death

      “Death is reversible.” So began NYU medical center’s director of Critical Care and Resuscitation Research Science, Sam Parnia, at a recent research consultation on people’s death experi...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Psychological Science: Full of Surprises?

    Photo courtesy Virginia Welle   At a recent Teaching of Psychology in Secondary Schools workshop hosted by Oregon State University, I celebrated and illustrated three sets of big ideas from psychological science...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Selfies vs. posies: Experiment example

    Students appreciate examples that are meaningful to them. How about a little selfie research?   After covering experiments in the Intro Psych research methods chapter, ask students to think about how they would ...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • 10,000 steps: A research methods example

    After covering experiments and correlations in Intro Psych or as a research methods booster in the Stress & Health chapter, ask your students if they have heard that you should walk 10,000 steps a day. Do they kno...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Chronotype and disease: Correlation still doesn't mean causation

    One of the perennial challenges in teaching Intro Psych is helping students understand that knowing that two variables are, say, positively correlated does not tell us anything about what causes that relationship. Dis...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Experiments: Practice identifying independent and dependent variables (Part 2)

    Last week, I gave five examples of experiments you can use to give students practice at identifying independent and dependent variables. Here are five more.   After covering these concepts, ask students to work ...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Experiments: Practice identifying independent and dependent variables

    Psychology students often struggle with the difference between the independent and dependent variables. After covering these concepts, ask students to work in pairs or small groups to identify both the independent var...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Examples: Comic strips that illustrate psychological concepts

    Cartoonists have pretty good insight into the workings of the human mind. How many of them took Intro Psych?   These comics will jazz up your next research methods, cognition, personality, learning, and social p...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Can your students fix these bad survey questions?

    Do you cover survey research in your Intro Psych course? Given the prevalence of bad surveys, I’m starting to think I should spend more time on it.   For a seemingly unlimited supply of bad survey question...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Polling Probabilities and Political Punditry

    After elections, people often note unexpected outcomes and then complain that “the polls got it wrong.”   After Donald Trump’s stunning 2016 presidential victory, the press gave us articles on ...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • The Pleasure and Puzzlement of Weird Coincidences

    Some fun emails stimulated by last week’s essay on loss aversion in sports and everyday life pointed me to statistician David Spiegelhalter's Cambridge Coincidence Collection, which contains people’s 4500+...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Phone distractions in a crosswalk: An observational research experience for your students

    No, your students will not be texting or talking/listening to a phone in a crosswalk! Instead, they will be observing others who are.   A recent study (Alsaleh, Sayed, & Zaki, 2018)* found that people who we...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • On the Reliability and Teaching of Psychological Science

    “The most famous psychological studies are often wrong, fraudulent, or outdated.” With this headline, Vox joins critics that question the reproducibility and integrity of psychological science’s find...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Depressed About the State of the World? Consider Some Heartening Facts

    The Syrian slaughter. North Korea nuclear warheads. ISIS attacks. School shootings. Social media-fed teen depression. Thugs victimizing people of color and women. Inequality increasing. Online privacy invaded. Climate...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Good Things and Bad Things Come in Bundles

    My colleague, Lindsay Root Luna, has new data showing that virtues correlate. People’s scores intercorrelate on scales assessing humility, justice, wisdom, forgiveness, gratitude, hope, and patience. Show her a ...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Seeing faces in toast and the fusiform face area

    Apophenia is seeing patterns in randomness, which may be the mechanism behind conspiracy theory generation. If it feels to me like a set of random events are connected and no one is talking about the connection, then ...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Killer Immigrants?

    Credit President Trump with consistency in cultivating public fears of immigrants: “When Mexico sends its people . . . they’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists.” (...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Do Guns Protect Us?

    Over lunch recently, a friend told about taking a firearm course, which enabled her to carry a concealed pistol and thus, she presumed, to live at less risk of harm.   Isn’t it obvious: If more of us have...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Psychology and DNA: Probability, Not Certainty

    I recently finished Sam Kean’s (2012),  The Violinist’s Thumb the history, the present, and the future of DNA research. Kean writes, “Genes don’t deal in certainties; they deal in probabil...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz