• The Arctic lacks monocular cues: How does that affect what we perceive?

    In the Intro Psych sensation and perception chapter, we often cover monocular cues. While it’s fine to think about how monocular cues help us perceive depth, I had never given much thought to what we would perce...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Disabilities We Seldom Notice

    If you have watched a 2019 Democratic Party debate, you perhaps have taken note: While Pete Buttigieg, Elizabeth Warren, and Cory Booker glide smoothly through their spoken words, Joe Biden sometimes hesitates, stamme...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • “Can You Repeat the Question?” Was Robert Mueller Exhibiting Age-Related Cognitive Decline—or Hearing Loss?

    On 48 occasions during his recent testimony regarding Russian election interference, former special counsel Robert Mueller—seeming “confused,” “uncertain,” and “forgetful”&mda...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • The Amazing Power of Attention

    I’m often asked: “What is your favorite introductory psych chapter?” I reply that, when starting to write my text, I presumed that Sensation-Perception would be the dullest topic. Instead, I’ve...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Where did our three little ear bones come from?

    One of the many things I love about teaching psychology is that I can learn something new about the field—about our humanness—just about anywhere. I am currently reading Skeleton Keys by Brian Switek (2019...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Experiments: Practice identifying independent and dependent variables

    Psychology students often struggle with the difference between the independent and dependent variables. After covering these concepts, ask students to work in pairs or small groups to identify both the independent var...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Color blindness: A mobile app demonstration

    Because the perception of color is inherent to our experience, it’s difficult to know what someone else’s perception of color is like. People with total color blindness (either monochromacy or achromatopsi...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Global Warming? It’s Freezing! (The Availability Heuristic Rides Again)

    Climate change has arrived. Greenhouse gases are accumulating. The planet and its oceans are warming. Glaciers and Arctic ice are retreating. The seas are rising. Extreme weather is becoming ever costlier—in mon...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Bone conduction headphones: Getting questions about these?

    You can buy a good pair of bone conduction headphones for under $150. Some of your students may have seen them or own a set. Here’s a little information to add to your next Intro Psych hearing lecture, or at lea...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Yanny and Laurel: What’s going on?

    Earlier this week, the Internet blew up when an ambiguous audio clip from Roland Szabo of Lawrenceville, GA was posted to Reddit (Salam & Victor, 2018).     Some people hear yanny,...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Our Perception of Sex

    Perceptual illusions are not only great fun, they also remind us of a basic truth: Our perceptions are more than projections of the world into our brain. As our brains assemble sensory inputs they construct our percep...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Seeing faces in toast and the fusiform face area

    Apophenia is seeing patterns in randomness, which may be the mechanism behind conspiracy theory generation. If it feels to me like a set of random events are connected and no one is talking about the connection, then ...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • High-pitch hearing test: A class demo

    I didn’t start covering hearing in my Intro Psych course until the earbud-style headphones became popular. When I heard music emanating from a student’s earbuds from the back of the room, I knew it was tim...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • The Least of My Mother’s Gifts: A Gene that Sparked A Life Plague, and Purpose

    As I draft this on Mother’s Day I think of my mother, who blessed me with nurturing and many other gifts, including, alas, the gift of her hearing loss . . . which she, in turn, had received from her mother. I b...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • May 14, 2017 comic strips to illustrate psych concepts

    One of my favorite sources for examples of psychological concepts are comic strips. Some of them get worked into lectures, others show up on exams, and sometimes I’ll offer them for a couple points extra credit,...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Using “The Dress” in the sensation and perception chapter

    After covering sensation and perception, take students back to 2015.   In case you missed it, this was the image that blew up social media in February of that year. Viewers were divided into two camps. Some sa...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Monocular Cues from Vienna, Austria

    When I cover monocular cues in the perception section of Intro Psych, I like to show students a few photos and have them identify the monocular cues in the photos. This also works as a small group activity – put...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Cheering Their Ears Out Redux

    My friend and psychology colleague, Sue Frantz, alerted me to the pride the University of Kansas athletic department took this week in setting a Guinness World Record—with a 130.4 decibel crowd roar during their...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • What makes these legs so shiny?

    Open your discussion of sensation and perception by showing students this image. Note the white on the clear bulb where the light is reflecting. Our eyes detect white, but our brains know that those white spots aren&#...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Speedy Vestibular Sense: Try This!

    Originally posted on September 15, 2016.   With thanks to Christopher Platt (NIDCD Director of Hearing and Balance programs), here’s a simple demonstration of our super-speedy vestibular system. As you hav...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers