• It’s Raining … Flash Drives? Harnessing the Positive Power of Relative Deprivation

    How you and I feel about our lives depends greatly on our social comparisons. We feel smart when others seem dimwitted, and grateful for our health when others are unwell. But sometimes during social comparisons our s...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • The Amazing Power of Attention

    I’m often asked: “What is your favorite introductory psych chapter?” I reply that, when starting to write my text, I presumed that Sensation-Perception would be the dullest topic. Instead, I’ve...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Helping students learn from their mistakes

    When I was in school, the first thing I did when I got a graded assignment or exam back was look at what I missed and why. I assumed that was what everyone did. False consensus effect, anyone?   In a webinar a n...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Advice for new instructors: What I know now that I wish I had known then

    While I am still not close to retirement, I am certainly closer to retirement than I am to my first year of teaching. This August will be the 30th anniversary of when I stepped in front of a classroom as a person of a...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Um… how can we reduce ums in our speech?

    As instructors, almost all of us are public speakers. We pay a lot of attention to our content, but how much do we pay attention to how we are presenting our content?   Um, if we, um, had as many ums in our writ...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Join me at the next AP Psych Reading!

    Do you teach Intro Psych? If so, I am personally inviting you to join me at the Advanced Placement (AP) Psychology Reading in Tampa next year (June 10-16, 2020; apply here). Choosing to attend the Reading was – ...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • “Implicit Egotism”: Astonishing Ways We Gravitate Toward Places, People, and Professions We Associate With Ourselves

    You surely know why you chose your town, your partner, and your vocation—all for good reasons, no doubt.   But might other unknown reasons—operating below the level of your conscious awareness–...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • 10,000 steps: A research methods example

    After covering experiments and correlations in Intro Psych or as a research methods booster in the Stress & Health chapter, ask your students if they have heard that you should walk 10,000 steps a day. Do they kno...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Chronotype and disease: Correlation still doesn't mean causation

    One of the perennial challenges in teaching Intro Psych is helping students understand that knowing that two variables are, say, positively correlated does not tell us anything about what causes that relationship. Dis...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • The Joy of Being Wrong

    What virtue is more needed in today’s contentious and polarized world than humility? We need deep-rooted convictions to fuel our passions, but also humility to restrain bull-headed fanaticism.   Along wit...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Use psychology to win millions

    As of this writing, Jeopardy! champion James Holzhauer has won 24 games for a total of $1,867,142.00. A lot of people are wondering how he has done it.   The next time you cover memory in Intro, ask your student...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Susan Burns Teaching Institute Poster Session: I-14 Teaching Sex and Gender during a #Metoo! #Timesup! Moment

    5/23/19 11:15 AM
    I-14 Teaching Sex and Gender during a #Metoo! #Timesup! Moment   Moments in history transform the conversation of our classrooms. MeToo! TimesUp! and other societal shifts are making issues of sex and gender ess...
    Alanna Smith
    last modified by Alanna Smith
    Susan Burns Teaching Institute Poster Session: I-14 Teaching Sex and Gender during a #Metoo! #Timesup! Moment
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  • APS Focus Group: Psychology of Sex and Gender

    5/24/19 8:00 AM
    APS Focus Group: Psychology of Sex and Gender  We will be sharing with you aspects of the text and media. If you currently teach the Psychology of Gender course, we would welcome your feedback.  T...
    Alanna Smith
    last modified by Alanna Smith
    APS Focus Group: Psychology of Sex and Gender
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  • Where did our three little ear bones come from?

    One of the many things I love about teaching psychology is that I can learn something new about the field—about our humanness—just about anywhere. I am currently reading Skeleton Keys by Brian Switek (2019...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Our Differences Seize Our Attention, Define Our Identity, and Sometimes Deceive Us

    “Self-consciousness [exists] in contrast with an ‘other,’ a something which is not the self.” ——C. S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain, 1940   We are, always and everywhere, self-co...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • What is your preferred form of address?

    This one is a challenge. I’ve taught in community colleges for almost 30 years. For the first half of my career, a lot of my students were older than me, and they were pretty stressed about taking their first co...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • One Antidote to Today’s Racism: A Historical and Personal Example

    It’s a core lesson of introductory psychology: Intergroup contact reduces prejudice (especially friendly, equal-status contact). As hundreds of studies show, attitudes—of White folks toward Black folks, of...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Race in America: Hate Up, Prejudice Down?

    There’s bad news and good news about Americans’ race relations and attitudes.   The bad news: People perceive race relations as worsening. In a 2019 Pew survey of 6637 Americans, 58 percent said tha...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers
  • Teaching Synesthesia

    I read The Man Who Tasted Shapes by the neurologist Richard Cytowic in the mid-1990s. Whenever the man ate something, he felt sensations on his skin. For example, eating chicken caused him to feel like his skin was be...
    Sue Frantz
    last modified by Sue Frantz
  • Showerthoughts

    Part of my text-writing pleasure is interjecting playful thoughts and tongue-in-cheek one-liners that students seem to enjoy: “Does the name Pavlov ring a bell?” (If I don’t enjoy writing—assum...
    David Myers
    last modified by David Myers