Flipped Chemistry Authors

Document created by Sara Hillman Employee on Oct 3, 2016Last modified by Sara Hillman Employee on Oct 17, 2016
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Kevin Revell

Kevin Revell

Kevin Revell received his bachelor's degree from the University of New Orleans in 1995, then his Master's Degree in Organic Chemistry from Iowa State in 2000. After several very formative years working in the pharmaceutical industry, he decided to go into education, and from 2002-2006 he taught chemistry at Southeastern University in Lakeland, FL. Following completion of his Ph.D. from the University of South Florida in 2006, Kevin joined the faculty at Murray State University in Murray, KY. Kevin's research interests include organic synthesis and functional organic materials. He loves to teach, and is increasingly interested in science education in flipped and online class settings. He and his wife Jennifer have 3 kids, and they stay busy between family, church, school, and playing basketball in the driveway.

Brandon Tenn

Brandon Tenn

Brandon Tenn is a physical chemist who earned his Bachelor's of Science degree in Math and Chemistry from the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 2001 and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from UC Davis in 2009. Between 2006 and 2010 he taught at both Sierra College and the California Maritime Academy. Since 2011 he has taught math and chemistry at Merced College. He is very interested in teaching developmental and introductory science and math courses utilizing an active learning approach. He has flipped every math and chemistry course he taught since Spring 2015 and continues to research best practices for the technique based on his target student populations.

 

Website: http://www.mccd.edu/academics/sme/profiles/tenn.html

Allison Soult

Allison Soult

Allison Soult received her B.S. in Chemistry from Centre College and her Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry from Florida State University. She has been at the University of Kentucky since 2002 as a lab coordinator and a lecturer.  She teaches 100-level chemistry courses for science majors, pre-professional students, and pre-nursing students. Her main interests are in the area of Chemical Education specifically relating to issues with student engagement in large lectures and using technology to enhance student learning. Allison was the recipient of the A&S Outstanding Staff Award in 2008 and was co-instructor for the University of Kentucky’s first massive online open course (MOOC) “Advanced Chemistry”.

 

Website: https://chem.as.uky.edu/users/assoul2

Kate Hayden

Kate Hayden

As an educator, researcher, wife and mother, I am dedicated to developing and assessing innovations in chemistry education, medical diagnostics, and the biophysical characterization of non-helical DNA structures found in the non-coding regions of the genome.

Peter Golden

Peter Golden

After completing my MS in Chemistry from the University of Houston, I began my community college teaching career at Isothermal Community College in Spindale, NC in 1987. I taught General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Health Science Chemistry, Trig based Physics and Calc based Physics. I moved to Sandhills Community College in Pinehurst, NC in 1999. I teach General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry there. I began “flipping” my chemistry course about 4 years ago. I liked the “flipped/hybrid” model. In my years of teaching I believe that when I lecture, I am going to fast for about 1/3 of the class and too slow for about 1/3 of the class. That means I am losing 2/3 of the class at any given time. By flipping the class and allowing students to watch lectures at their own pace, we are able to work problems in class and I can offer “instantaneous” assistance. 

John Osterhout

John Osterhout

John Osterhout received his B.S. in Biochemistry from Rice University and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Texas at Austin. John was a member of the Rowland Institute for Science in Cambridge Massachusetts for thirteen years before moving to the University of Arizona. Since 2008 John has been Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas. John's research interests are in protein folding, Trojan horse inhibitors for HIV and snake venom proteins. He teaches general chemistry and biophysical chemistry. John uses flipped classrooms for both courses.

Donna McGregor

Donna McGregor

Donna McGregor earned her PhD in Analytical Chemistry from The Graduate Center, CUNY. Her personal esearch interests lie mainly in the fields of Chemical Education pedagogy and technetium-99 radioactive waste remediation. Her recent work in chemical education pedagogy has led to venturing into online education. With Professor Pam Mills she authored a hybrid general chemistry course for 250 students that piloted in the Spring of 2014. 

Pamela Mills

Pamela Mills

Pamela Mills is a professor of chemistry at Lehman College. She spends most of her time working with Prof. McGregor on the design of a General Chemistry hybrid course taken by all chemistry students at Lehman College. Prof. Mills is also the PI of the PERC Program – a novel instructional model for transforming the high school math and science classrooms. Most of her time is spent working with chemistry high school teachers or designing videos for the college classroom.

Scott A. Reid

Scott A. Reid

Dr. Reid is currently Professor and Chairperson in the Department of Chemistry at Marquette University. He received a B.S. degree from Union University (Jackson, TN) in 1985, and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) in 1990 under the direction of J. Douglas McDonald. His interests in molecular spectroscopy and chemical dynamics led him to the University of Southern California, where he completed post-doctoral training under the direction of Hanna Reisler. He came to Marquette as an Assistant Professor in 1994, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2000 and Professor in 2005. In 2004, he spent a semester at National Tsing Hua University (Hsinchu, Taiwan) as an NSC fellow, working in the group of Professor Yuan-Pern Lee. In 2010, he was awarded a Way-Klingler sabbatical fellowship, which he spent at UW-Madison and University of Sydney (Australia).

Cynthia Lebrake

Cynthia LaBrake

Cynthia LaBrake is a senior lecturer at the University of Texas at Austin and the mother of three boys. She enjoys team teaching large sections (350 – 500 students per semester) with her co-course developer and teaching partner David Vanden Bout and continuing to curate developed content with her other co-course developer colleague Paul McCord. She also serves as a Faculty Affiliate to the Center for Teaching and Learning sharing her experience and expertise with her faculty colleagues across the campus.

Stephen Habay

Stephen Habay

I joined the Chemistry Department at Salisbury University in 2008. I teach organic and general chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, and a chemistry course for non-science majors. I earned a bachelor of science in chemistry from Allegheny College in Meadville, PA in 2000 and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh in 2005. From 2006-2008, I did postdoctoral work at UC-Irvine and taught simultaneously at Irvine Valley College in southern CA. I’m always looking for fun and interactive ways to deliver content to students. I have been creating video lectures, experimenting with flipping various topics, and integrating online homework into my courses over the last five years. I also conduct research focusing on the development of new methods for alkaloid synthesis. In addition to chemistry, I enjoy reading, cooking, spending time with my wife and daughter, and watching Steelers football games.

Kevin Davies

Kevin Davies

My usual courses are General and Analytical Chemistry at Florida Gulf Coast University, and also have taught courses on computational methods in chemistry, technology in science education, and lasers in the physical sciences. I completed my Ph.D. at the University of Pittsburgh in 2008, before taking a Visiting Assistant Professor Position at James Madison University in VA, and ultimately settling down in Fort Myers, FL. A few years ago, I began making “Office Hours in a Box” tutorial videos for my courses, and replacing portions of my in-class lectures with problem-solving workshops. Over the last few years, I have expanded these efforts and have fully flipped my classrooms. I use lecture videos of my own making, example videos and interactive modules, and in-class workshops that focus on problem-solving, constructing authentic models for understanding phenomena, and building generative knowledge. My recent research has included the study of environmental factors that lead to landmine degradation (with an eye toward efficient remediation approaches), and the identification of molecules that can be used for sensing in turbid media (such as groundwaters and living tissues). When I’m not wearing my professor hat, I spend time with my wife and daughter, brew beer, and play at woodworking. My approach to relaxation and work can be summarized as, “if something’s not breaking or on fire, you’re not pushing hard enough.”

David Collins

David Collins

David C. Collins earned a bachelor of science degree in chemistry from Weber State University in 1997 and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from Brigham Young University in 2001. After a short stint as an assistant professor at Weber State University teaching forensic science, he worked as an assistant professor of chemistry at Colorado State University - Pueblo from 2003-2006. While in Colorado, he additionally worked summers as a visiting scientist at Palmar Technologies. Currently he teaches chemistry and conducts separation science research at Brigham Young University - Idaho. Publications include both scientific and pedagogical articles, including forensic science educational material. David has a great interest in chemistry pedagogy. He was honored in 2005 with the Faculty Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award, and in 2013 with an Exemplary Faculty Award from Brigham Young University - Idaho.

Katherine Miller

Katherine Miller

I usually teach General Chemistry I and II and some combination of our three upper level Biochemistry courses with the occasional general education course tossed in just to mix things up. I have also taught courses in forensic chemistry and NMR spectroscopy. I earned my bachelor's degree in chemistry from Mississippi State University and my doctorate in Biomedical Research from Washington University in St. Louis. I'm always looking for ways to engage my students in and outside of class and enjoy hearing about what other faculty are doing. I have been flipping portions of my General Chemistry classes for a year and am in the process of writing a paper analyzing student success rates and student video viewing habits in these classes.

 

My current research is focused on the microbial communities in several local wetlands, how they change seasonally and how these changes may influence the removal of nitrate from run-off. I enjoy wading through the muck to see what is there, although I could do without the mosquitoes. When I'm not out bicycling, I'm often spinning, dying, or weaving yarn with the help of my cat.

David Rieck

David Rieck

I am a Professor of Chemistry at Salisbury University where I have been teaching since 1987. I teach primarily general chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and physical science for non-science majors. Over the years, however, I have also taught organic chemistry, instrumental analysis, and physical chemistry. I received my Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison where I studied the organometallic chemistry of metal cluster compounds.

 

For the past few years I have been incorporating a variety of instructional methods in my classes. In particular, I have spent quite a bit of time developing materials for flipping general chemistry classes. I continue to develop new materials, but I am now also exploring ways to gather quantitative data to assess the effectiveness of class flipping. Besides teaching chemistry at Salisbury University, I periodically conduct workshops for regional elementary and middle school teachers. In these workshops we focus on giving the teachers a deeper understanding of physical science content so that they can be more confident and comfortable teaching science in their classes. Outside of chemistry I spend time with my wife chasing after our dogs, and I enjoy hiking, running, and curling. Yes, curling.

Jim Zoval

Jim Zoval

Jim Zoval is a Professor of Chemistry at Saddleback College in Mission Viejo, CA. In addition to teaching, He has held positions as a Research Scientist at LightSense Inc., Sr. Project Engineer at Nanogen Inc., Research Specialist at University of California, and Sr. Manager of Special Projects Research at Burstein Technologies Inc. Most of his work has been in the chemical and engineering areas of medical and clinical diagnostic platform development.  His professional publications include his own General, Organic, and Biochemistry textbook, several chapters in other textbooks, 30 journal publications, and 5 patents.  Dr. Zoval has an undergraduate research group at Saddleback College that focuses on investigating technologies that will enable artificial, automated, wearable kidneys for individuals with renal failure.

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