Introduction to Homework Assignments

Document created by Vishal Sharma on Jan 12, 2017Last modified by Vishal Sharma on Jan 13, 2017
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We highly recommend you review Homework Assignment Requirements and Best Practices before beginning to create Homework Assignments.

What are Homework activities?

Homework is an assignment primarily designed to reinforce knowledge provided in lecture, reading, or other activities. Homework is generally graded and often incorporates some level of support to help students arrive at the correct answer or understand where they need help. For example, homework may link to the ebook, tutorials, or answer-specific feedback.

Typical Uses

  • Student self-check or practice problems
  • Reading verification
  • PreLecture, PreLab, or formative assessment

Please visit the following article for an introductory video on creating Homework sets: How to create Homework sets and choose settings (VIDEO). NOTE: Make sure to require that your students submit answers to every question. If they don’t hit "submit" for every question, the questions won’t auto-score, and you’ll have to manually input the assignment grade in the gradebook. You may want to tell students verbally, as well as include a statement in the homework activity's directions.

 

What makes Homework different from Quizzes?

Homework activities allow students to submit each question in an assignment independently from the next. In that way it mirrors the pencil and paper process of doing math homework. Your student does a problem. She checks it. She tries again if it's not right. And when she's ready she moves on to the next problem.

The homework activities will remind you of LaunchPad's Quiz feature, but there are several differences, noted below.

Homework activities allow instructors to:

  • Assign settings by question. This includes the title visible to students, number of attempts, weighting points for grading, and review settings;

Homework activities allow students to:

  • View the question title to know the source of the question (example: Chapter 04, Section 3, Exercise 15);
  • Submit each question independently from the next question in the assignment;
  • Review individual question submissions, as permitted by instructor settings, without completing other questions;
  • Try a question again if they got it wrong the first time (or multiple times, depending on how many chances you give them).
 

What courses have homework?

A list of the titles with homework activities can be found on the discipline catalog pages:

 

How can I Preview Homework activities as a student?

Once a student has submitted an attempt to a Homework Assignment, you will be unable to make edits to questions, question settings and overall activity settings for the homework. This includes when you take the Homework Assignment in "View as Student" mode.

If you want to be able preview a Homework Assignment, and be able to edit the assignment afterwards, you will need to create a special branch of your course to be used solely for previewing homework assignments. Please follow the instructions in the help article How can I review Homework activities as a student? to see how to do this. Otherwise, remember to make edits to all of the questions and settings before students begin the activity and avoid previewing the activity in "View as Student" mode.

How can I Preview Homework activities as a student?
 

Previewing vs. editing questions

You should always use the "Preview" button to preview a question and NOT the "Edit" button. Choosing "Edit" tells LaunchPad that you do not want this question replaced by a publisher provider update, should one occur. This will happen even if you don't actually alter the question in any way.

For more information on how to preview a question, please refer to the help article How do I preview a Homework activity question?.

For more information on how to edit a question, please refer to the help article How do I edit a Homework activity question?.

 

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