Morris, Biology: How Life Works, 2e

Document created by Digital Support on Jan 25, 2017Last modified by Digital Support on Oct 6, 2017
Version 9Show Document
  • View in full screen mode

LaunchPad contains resources for you and your students. In this tutorial, we'll take a detailed look at both types separately. Let's begin with student resources. Click the following link to go to the landing page of LaunchPad for Biology: How Life Works.


What resources are available for my students?

From your LaunchPad home page, click Resources, then Content by Type. You'll see a list of all the resources available to your students. We'll now take a closer look at each.


Click on the image to zoom in.
 

3D Animations

Animation Activities are 3-D animations, designed by Rob Lue, that bring biological processes to life, place them in context, and give students an intuitive sense of how these processes work. Each Animation Activity is accompanied by assignable assessment questions that focus on the core concepts presented in the animation.


Click on the image to zoom in.

 

Animations

Animations are 2-D, simple animations that help students visualize and understand basic processes.

 

e-Book

The e-Book is every page of the printed text, including all chapters, sections, cases, preface, glossary, and index.

 

Experiment and Data Analysis Primers

Data analysis and experimental design are skills that are best learned through practice. For that reason, the HLW authors have created a data analysis package that teaches these skills and provides a way to practice them. Four primers first provide a base of knowledge on major topics in data gathering and analysis: Experimental Design, Data and Data Presentation, Statistics, and Scale and Approximation. The brief (4-page) chapter-style primers can be assigned individually and can be found in the Experiments and Data Analysis unit in the LaunchPad.


After reading the primers to learn the ideas and terms behind how scientists conduct research and analyze and interpret results, students can practice what they’ve learned with the Working with Data question sets. Each set of 8 to 10 questions is tied to one of the How Do We Know figures that introduce students to the process of scientific inquiry. These questions guide the student toward a deeper understanding of the experiments and their results. For example, students are asked to pick out hypotheses, make inferences, and predict results under altered conditions. At the same time the questions give students practice in applying key concepts taught in the data analysis primers, including working with exponents and logarithms, interpreting graphs, spotting correlations, and understanding simple statistics.



Click on the image to zoom in.

 

LearningCurve

Developed in light of the latest advances in learning research, LearningCurve’s game-like adaptive quizzing is available for every chapter or module of the text.


LearningCurve provides a unique learning path for each student, with quizzes shaped by each individual’s correct and incorrect answers. The less a student knows about a topic, the more LearningCurve focuses on it. And the better a student does, the more difficult the questions become. Feedback for each question includes live links to e-Book pages relevant to the topic at hand, guiding students to the reading they need to do to address areas that are giving them difficulty. Because LearningCurve is a formative assessment and not graded on an A-F scale, many instructors have found it to be an ideal source for pre-lecture assignments, with students coming to class more prepared to participate. LearningCurve is equally effective when used as a post-lecture review. Instructors have also found that making LearningCurve a small percentage of the overall grade further incentivizes students to take advantage of it when preparing for class.


 

Mirror Experiment Activities

Explore the same concepts as experiments in “How Do We Know” figures in the text. Questions accompanying the experiment descriptions and data allow students to practice interpreting data and understanding experimental design. Instructions link out to the Experiment and Data Analysis Primers.


Click on the image to zoom in.

 

Simulation

Simulation Activities are designed for those concepts students can learn best by doing, rather than by reading or watching. Each simulation allows students to explore biological processes, problem-solve by doing, and make predictions. Accompanying assessment questions lead students through the simulation so they can work through a Core Concept.


Click on the image to zoom in.

 

Topical Modules

These modules bring together existing content in the book for a topical look at important themes in biology.


Click on the image to zoom in.
 

Visual Synthesis Map

Visual Synthesis Activities are dynamic, zoomable versions of the 2-page Visual Synthesis figures that appear in the textbook. By exploring the map and zooming in and out, students can see both the big picture and the details, building a framework for how concepts connect and relate. Accompanying assessment questions help guide students through the map.


Click on the image to zoom in.
 

Working with Data Activities

The Working with Data question sets contain 8 to 10 questions tied to one of the "How Do We Know" figures that introduce students to the process of scientific inquiry. These questions guide the student toward a deeper understanding of the experiments and their results. For example, students are asked to pick out hypotheses, make inferences, and predict results under altered conditions.


At the same time the questions give students practice in applying key concepts taught in the data analysis primers, including working with exponents and logarithms, interpreting graphs, spotting correlations, and understanding simple statistics. Clicking on highlighted key terms will bring up definitions from the primers. Where appropriate, links accompanying a question bring up relevant sections from the primers. The Working with Data question sets will be found in the chapter units in LaunchPad.



Click on the image to zoom in.

 

What resources are available for instructors?

From the same screen where you've been viewing student resources, you can scroll down to see those available to instructors. Let's now take a closer look at each.


Click on the image to zoom in.

 

Animation Slides

Here, 2-D Animations are loaded into PowerPoint slides so you can easily use them in your classroom.

 

Assessments (Editable)

The full set of assessments in an editable Word document format.

 

Chapter Figures, Photos, and Tables (.zip)

Every figure and image, in JPEG format, from all 49 chapters and 8 Cases.

 

Chapter Figures, Photos, and Tables (editable)

Every figure and image, in editable JPEG format, from all 49 chapters and 8 Cases.

 

Chapter Figures, Photos, and Tables (unlabelled)

Every figure and image, in unlabelled JPEG format, from all 49 chapters and 8 Cases.

 

Chapter Figures, Photos, and Tables (unlocked)

Every figure and image, in unlocked JPEG format, from all 49 chapters and 8 Cases.

 

Homework Assignments

Chapter Homework is a part of our collection of pre-made assignments made from our bank of questions. These questions were designed to align with the core concepts of the chapter, and to align with each other so that what students practice before coming to class, what they do in class, and what they are assigned for homework, all prepare them for the type of questions they'll encounter on an exam.

 

Image Slides

Every figure and image, in PowerPoint, from all 49 chapters and 8 Cases.


Click on the image to zoom in.

 

In-Class Activities

A rich collection of in-class activities provides active learning materials for instructors to use in a variety of settings. The activity collection was designed to cover a range of classroom sizes and complexity levels, and many can be easily adapted to suit the available time and preferred teaching style. Each activity includes a detailed activity guide for instructors. The activity guide introduces the activity, outlines learning objectives, and provides guidance on how to implement and customize the activity. Active learning exercises are an important component of the learning pathway and provide students with hands-on exploration of challenging topics and misconceptions. The second edition of Biology: How Life Works includes a new collection of over 40 in-class activities crafted to address the concepts that students find most challenging.


Click on the image to zoom in.

 

In-Class Question Slides

Here, In-Class Questions are loaded into PowerPoint slides so you can easily use them in your classroom. These questions were designed to align with the core concepts of the chapter, and to align with each other so that what students practice before coming to class, what they do in class, what they are assigned for homework all prepare them for the type of questions they'll encounter on an exam.


Click on the image to zoom in.
 

Lecture Slides

Lectures for use with PowerPoint are pre-made PowerPoint slides that can be used in your lecture. Each slide is designed to be image and figure heavy, keeping the words on the screen to a minimum. If you look in the NOTES section under each slide, additional information is available to you, the instructor.


Click on the image to zoom in.

 

Pre-Class Assignments

Pre-Class Assignments are a part of our collection of pre-made assignments made from our bank of questions. These questions were designed to align with the core concepts of the chapter, and to align with each other so that what students practice before coming to class, what they do in class, what they are assigned for homework, all prepare them for the type of questions they'll encounter on an exam.

 

Tips and Techniques in Active Learning with Jenny Knight, UC-B

These videos from professor Jenny Knight (University of Colorado, Boulder) cover topics like flipping the classroom and incorporating active learning into large classrooms.

 

Visual Synthesis Activities

HLW’s Visual Synthesis Maps are uniquely fit for helping students see interrelationships in complex systems; for suggestions on how to use these maps to enhance student learning and instruction, instructors can consult Visual Synthesis Map In Use documents. Members of the author team have written homework assignments, in-class discussion or clicker quiz questions, and lecture prompts for five of the maps.

 

Visual Synthesis Map Tutorials

Instructors preparing to use Visual Synthesis Maps in class can prepare by watching these short tutorial videos that demonstrate how to navigate the maps’ interface. It’s also possible to copy and assign these tutorials for students using the Visual Synthesis Maps on their own.


Attachments

    Outcomes