Video Assignment: Communicating with Your Instructors

Document created by Bethany Gordon Employee on Mar 29, 2017Last modified by Bethany Gordon Employee on Mar 29, 2017
Version 2Show Document
  • View in full screen mode


 

Video title: Seven Email Blunders You Don’t Want to Make

Topic(s): E-mail, communicating with instructors

Search terms: video seven email blunders

Time (of video): 3:51

Posted by: Rackspace

Date posted: October 5, 2012

 

Video description: E-mail blunders could, at best, lead to awkward moments and, at worst, end a career. Watch these seven reminders of what not to do.

 

Question/writing prompt:  Think about the emails you’ll send to instructors, friends, family, and coworkers in the next year. Select three tips and describe a situation likely to occur in the near future to which you can apply this advice.

 

In-class activities:

  1. Proofreading E-mails Objective: Students practice strategies for proofreading e-mails.

      

Show the video from 1:10 to 1:38. Have students use their phones, tablets, or computers to compose an e-mail that they will not send. They should accept all autocorrect changes. Discuss the results of the autocorrect, and the benefits of reading an e-mail out loud.

 

   2. Angry E-mails Objective: Students learn the value of e-mailing only when in the right state of mind.

 

Try to find examples of "angry" e-mails online (you may even have your own examples). Show the video from 3:01 to 3:32 and have students provide examples of why they should never send an e-mail when angry.

 

1. Find examples of employee rants on social media sites to demonstrate why it is so important to resist posting anything when angry.

2. Ask students to write an email to an instructor with a "no excuses" policy requesting permission to take the final exam at a different time due to a family   obligation. Students should send the e-mail to the instructor of this college success course.

3. Respond to these student e-mails.

4. Discuss the value of being calm when e-mailing and the importance of never e-mailing when angry.

Attachments

    Outcomes