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If you're just starting out with LaunchPad and you are overwhelmed with the number and variety of resources in the product, just start with LearningCurve. Assign one LearningCurve before each class period so students come to class prepared for discussion. This will allow you more freedom in your class to talk about what's important, and you can see which students are doing the work or which topics are causing problems. And though it's hard to believe, students consistently, over the years, report actually enjoying doing work in LearningCurve because they can make progress, ask questions, and they actually learn! They view the interface as 'game-like' and the online format allows them to learn without feeling silly by asking questions in class. It's a win-win, so give it a try! 

 

 

And if you're nervous, reach out to our implementation team of help in setting up your course quickly and easily. We're here to help! 

 

In the summer of 2018, we had a number of faculty come into our New York office to review our plans for digital offerings going forward, and also to tell us how they are using our products. My favorite presentation from that time was from Tim Molina at Northwest Vista College in Texas talking about getting students to go media-free in his communication class. If you're looking for something fun and interesting to do this semester, check out this 16 minute video. Thanks, Tim! 

If you have students who want to get the print book to go with LaunchPad or LaunchPadSolo, please be sure to alert them to the options at the Student Store. 

 

store.macmillanlearning.com

 

Why rent textbooks from Macmillan Learning?  

Renting textbooks can help students save money throughout their college career. Textbooks rentals are available from 3 months to 1 year—choose the duration that works best. The best part of all? We offer free shipping for all hard-copy textbook rentals with immediate 14-day access to the online e-textbook.

 

Did you know that you can integrate iClicker into your LaunchPad course to keep all your grades in one place? And that you can use iClicker for attendance? With iClicker, use GPS technology to ensure that students are attending class. No more attendance codes that can be easily shared via text!

 

Learn more or sign up for a demonstration.

Becky Anderson

First Day of Class

Posted by Becky Anderson Employee Dec 27, 2018

As you start to prep for your next round of classes, don't forget that we have syllabus inserts and presentation decks for you to use to help students get registered with LaunchPad. 

 

Please view the following presentation slides and download the attached syllabus insert, input your course information, and share them with your students prior to your first day of class. You can post them in your learning management system, e-mail them, or print them out to distribute in class.

If you want to make any changes to the presentation slides, go to File > Make a copy and edit the copy you create.

Good luck and let us know if you have any questions as you start up classes! 

Macmillan is offering a series of free webinars the week of October 15th to 19th that will share concepts, products, ideas and the underlying research and science as they pertain to the use of various classroom technologies.

 

We are proud to partner with Mats Selen, Tyler Dewitt, iclicker, our internal Learning Science team, Vaughn Scribner, and GoReact as we present a virtual week with something for literally everybody.

 

Please register - note that registration will also ensure that you receive a post meeting recording link.

 

Direct URL for registration - https://go.macmillanlearning.com/webinar-week.html

When creating or revising an online course, there are many factors to consider. Not only should the course contain engaging content that will capture and hold the attention of students, but it should also be easy to access and navigate.

In this webinar on September 25 at 2pm Eastern, attendees will hear from Dr. Stephanie Richmond, Associate Professor at Norfolk State University, who will share her expertise in building online courses using Macmillan’s LaunchPad integrated with Blackboard Learn. Dr. Richmond’s best practices for creating a sticky and easy-to-use experience for students and instructors alike will give you the knowledge and confidence to develop your own successful online course.

Register here for this great event and we'll see you on September 25th! (And if you can't come, we'll be sure to post the recording afterwards.) 

We have a few changes that we think you’ll like for Fall 2018 classes.

 

  1. If you are using the quiz program that allows for you to use filters, we now have the ability to print. When you are in the Review & Modify tab, you will now see a button that says “Print” in the top left. Download e-Book Link
  2. Most LaunchPads now have a downloadable ebook. Students can look under the Help link in the upper right for the option to “Download Offline eBook”. Here’s what the download link looks like and here are the directions for using it.Download e-Book Link
  3. Speaking of which, if you are looking at the Help link above, and go to one of the Support Sites, you’ll notice that we have a new self-help support center that we’re excited about. We hope you’ll find it easier to use.
  4. Lastly, we now have what we call “seamless access” to LaunchPad via the Macmillan Learning Student Store. That means that students can buy or rent the book or LaunchPad or combination of book and LaunchPad that works for them in the Store and, once they purchase, they will automatically be let into their LaunchPad course--without the need for codes! The directions will be posted on this page for your use this fall.
Five Things to Know About First-Year Students 
A Food for Thought Webinar 
Tuesday, August 14, 2018, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM ET

 

Our efforts to support first-year transition spread numerous topics, functional areas, and interventions. And, the amount of information and research about first-year college students that drives our efforts can be overwhelming. With so much information to use, how do higher education professional know what is the most important? In short, what are the key things to know about first-year college students? In this webinar, we’ll use Skyfactor data to explore five key facts about first-year students and how this information can be used to better support their transition to and success in college. Register today. 

 

SF.IMG-PH.[Headshot_Venaas].png
Presented by 
Matthew Venaas 
Research Manager at Skyfactor
Join the webinar, A Master Class in Teaching With Digital, on August 15 at 2:00 PM EST. You'll learn how impactful learning platforms can be for today’s students, and how the Bookshelf platform can help drive student engagement and success.

Topics include:
  • Using instructor tools for assignment creation and reporting
  • Analytics to track student progress and engagement
  • Student study tools such as flashcards, notes, and highlighters, as well as text-to-speech capability
Presented by:
Rainna Erikson -Senior Product Manager, VitalSource
Daniel Green - Director of Product Analytics, VitalSource
Hannah Mullis - Adjunct Instructor of Communication at William Peace University
Blair Tuckman, Senior Marketing Manager - VitalSource
Rainna Erikson
Senior Product Manager, VitalSource
Daniel Green
Director of Product Analytics, VitalSource
Hannah Mullis
Adjunct Instructor, William Peace University
Blair Tuckman
Senior Marketing Manager, VitalSource
Register today for this insightful webinar. 

      As a project for my graduate Sociolinguistics class this year, I organized a paper around the differences between how females and males interact with their instructors or professors in a freshman, on-campus classroom. Not surprisingly, women tended to ask more questions and interact with their instructors. However, both genders seemed to be more informal with their professors than I previously thought. This research made me curious: Is it the same with online classes? Who, exactly, makes up an online class? While I have discussed in previous posts that the popularity with online classes is on the rise with adults, I began to think about the gender differences in participants of online classes. Is there a trend amongst participants in these classes?

 

      Doing a little research, I came across an article from U.S. News by Devon Haynie that found that not only are younger students becoming more drawn to online classes, but females seem to be the majority of these students. This statistic actually surprised me, but upon further reading, it shouldn't have. The article states that " At the undergraduate level, 70 percent of students were women. Among graduate students, 72 percent of students were female" (Haynie). While this particular article is from 2015, the numbers continue along the same trajectory. Aslanian Market Research suggests this could be because of the types of careers that women choose--namely social work, health, and medication. 

 

      One statistic, however, did not surprise me. Haynie reports that other research shows that business administration is the number one online degree, followed closely by nursing. This fact was not surprising to me for the simple fact that I witness this phenomenon every day at the university where I teach. As a Humanities teaching assistant, I am well aware of the fact that these degrees are highly sought after for their practicality and career outlook.  Both of these degrees are extremely popular, and many of the students I teach go down these paths. Another statistic from the study shows that self-motivation is another problem for these online students. I know this well as it was an issue for me as I attempted a number of online classes to complete my undergraduate degree. 

 

The questions still remain, however. Will these gender-specific trends continue? Will these online degrees remain the most popular options for industrious men and women? Only time will tell. 

 

For more information, see Haynie's article from U. S. News entitled "Younger Students Increasingly Drawn to Online Learning..." https://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2015/07/17/younger-students-increasingly-drawn-to-online-lear… 

   I know this is a little nerdy of me, but I love syllabi, particularly for English literature classes since I am an English grad student. However, all versions of syllabi fascinate me. Math syllabi, with their concentration on practical examples; History syllabi, with the main focus being on reading and memorizing dates and facts; or English, with their focus on book chapters and paper guidelines. The syllabus is a crucial part of the college classroom for a myriad of reasons, and every student interprets and uses their syllabus in different ways. For some instructors, the syllabus is a nightmare; just one more piece of writing to do that stands between them and the actual class material. For others, the syllabus is a way to connect with their students, to establish a personality, and to excite (ok, prepare) the students for what is to come in the semester. However, different types of classes require different types of syllabi. 

   Online class syllabi are another syllabi altogether. Instead of focusing on the physical interaction between the instructor and the students, online syllabi put their emphasis on the expectations for the online classroom and the students. I've come up with a few differences between an on-campus and an online syllabus. I've also included a link to an example online syllabus, which can be extremely beneficial in planning your own online class.

 

1. Tone

The tone is an important part of the online syllabus mostly because it is the only interaction between instructor and student, and must convey the seriousness of the work assigned while allowing the instructor's personality to come through. 

 

2. Computer Requirements 

This is an example of a syllabus item that works solely for online classes. This is important because many students are not aware of the types of software they might have to download or different types of media they might have to watch. Outlining these requirements on the syllabus is imperative for the organization of the student, and yet, I can say from experience that I have never seen this section on any online class I have ever taken. 

 

3. Netiquette

The online class syllabi needs to be a place to practice the ways in which people interact online. This discourse, called netiquette, is a way for students to learn about the effective and ineffective methods of online interactions argument and discussion. 

 

4. Links

Another example of online-only syllabi design are links to specific websites and articles that will be used throughout the class. I have taken a number of online classes where the instructor gives no links to anything that they will be using to teach the class. This is frustrating, to say the least, and ensures that I take time to hunt this information down myself. Personally, I do not believe this should be the student's responsibility. Students struggling to maintain good grades in different classes need to be able to focus on the actual work, not the mechanics of where to locate it. 

 

 

These are just a few examples of how online syllabi differ from that of an on-campus syllabus. There are different needs and requirements, and both instructor and student need to be aware of the differences--it will make the online learning environment an easier place to educate and be educated. 

 

This sample syllabus is from the Pasadena City College website. 

http://online.pasadena.edu/faculty/files/2012/02/Online-Syllabus-Example-CANVAS-New-Login.pdf 

      Recently, I was skimming an article on the dangers of cheating services for online classes (What can I say? I like to know what my students might be doing...), and the author gave some alternatives to abusing online classes for people who tended to stress about them. That got me thinking: Are students aware that there is help available to them? Do they know that there are other options besides resorting to cheating in an online class? Many students feel as if there is no other option; they are too stressed with deadlines, life factors, and unrealistic goals to consider the options available to them in helping them succeed throughout their college career. As a TA, observing college freshmen has become a full-time hobby for me, and the reason is not just professional.

 

      As I watch these younger students struggle with their new-found freedom and coursework, I'm reminded of all the practical information that they should receive during their first year in higher education. I've never been one for abstract thinking; to me, there needs to be a practical purpose behind everything we do in college. When students begin to advance in their educational journey, online classes become an increasingly popular way to continue college classwork while seemingly taking the "easy" road. While you don't have to be in a physical classroom, online classes, however,  can still be stressful. The simple lack of teacher-student interaction can put certain students at a disadvantage, especially if the student does better in a physical classroom. Cheating in an online class can seem like a gigantic help if the student sees no other way of being successful in the class. Being the practical person that I am, I've compiled a list of things students might do instead of resorting to the act that will haunt them for the rest of their college career.

 

1. Ask a professor/instructor for advice. 

Students are painfully unaware at times of just how much they should ask for help/advice when it comes to the online college classroom. Most are afraid of looking incompetent and risk getting the help they need. Here's a secret, however: Professors are here to help you. The majority of them want you to ask questions and to feel comfortable seeking help. Don't understand a discussion group? Ask for help. Can't figure out where to post an assignment? Ask for help. Not 100% sure what the professor is wanting from a certain paper? Ask for help. Nine times out of ten, they'll be incredibly glad that you asked. An effort is extremely appreciated in higher education. 

 

2. Make sure you absolutely have to have this particular online course. 

Many students make the mistake of taking an online class so it'll be "easier" on them. In a way, it's completely understandable. I've done that myself. However, I've never backed myself into a corner when it comes to the assignments. I know my limit and I don't exceed it. Too many students sign up for an online class and are blown away by the sheer amount of reading or writing. This makes them stressed, puts them behind, and can ultimately lead to cheating in some form or fashion. If you don't need this particular class, don't sign up for it. Know your limits and what you are capable of at this point in your education.

 

3. Don't be afraid to drop the class. 

This particular piece of advice could scare some students away. Drop a class? I would never! Hear me out: Instead of struggling and stressing and cheating to stay afloat, just drop the class. Recognize that this isn't the best situation for you. So many students struggle with when to finish college; they are so worried about a specific timeline for their life that they can resort to things that hurt them in the long run. Personally, it took me 14 years to complete my undergraduate degree. I had a kid, worked in the real world for a bit, and then was able to finish. One great thing I learning from the experience? There's no need to rush. I'd rather give 100% and do my very best work than rush myself through the biggest undertaking of my life.

 

While there are other ways to help students navigate the online education waters, these tips are just a few of the ways that students can take a deep breath and hopefully put some thought into their educational decisions. 

 

If you are interested in the previously mentioned article on the dangers of cheating in online classes, see https://www.usnews.com/education/online-learning-lessons/articles/2017-01-27/4-dangers-of-cheating-services-for-online-c… 

Becky Anderson

Maintenance on 4/29/18

Posted by Becky Anderson Employee Apr 25, 2018

We will be performing system maintenance on Sunday morning (4/29) from 12:01am Eastern until 7am Eastern. This LaunchPad family of products will not be available during these 7 hours. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please plan accordingly and thank you for your patience.

For me, there have always been pros and cons to online classes. The pro category is mostly the flexibility aspect. It's hard to compete with. But honestly, there are many cons, and I see them as a college instructor AND as a student. There's something to be said for interactions between the teacher and their class, and online classes lose that authenticity. However, one of the biggest issues surrounding online education is who benefits from it. It would be naive to assume that every student would benefit from an online class, because, well.....no two students are alike. While teachers must do the best they can for the largest number of students, students who struggle in college end up on the losing side. They aren't challenged, there is no personal interaction with the teacher, and the class structure can cause problems. 

 

In Susan Dynarski's New York Times article, "Online Courses are Harming the Students who Need Help the Most," the author takes a brief glance at the reality behind online education for those students who do not excel in college. While backing up her story with recent data, Dynarski tells us that the main issue for these students who are less academically proficient is the lack of teacher-student interaction. These students need encouragement, and face-to-face classes are exceptionally better at providing this for them. 

 

While proficient students who excel in college tend to do better in online classrooms, it is hard for teachers to balance out the needs of both. Dynarski suggests that the research behind "blended" classes (a hybrid of both online and in-person classes) is something that needs to be looked at. These classes could bring positives to both groups of students, and that is something we should be focusing on---giving a fair shot to every student.

 

 

For more information on this subject, see Susan Dynarski's article: Online Courses Are Harming the Students Who Need the Most Help - The New York Times