Elizabeth Uva

How to keep your office hours efficient

Blog Post created by Elizabeth Uva Employee on Jul 11, 2016

Originally posted by Kelli Mayes-Denker.

Have you had a student stop by during office hours only to mention that they "just don’t get chapter 5"? For a student, this specific chapter may be especially daunting. In reality, there are probably a few distinct concepts the student is struggling with, thus causing problems throughout the entire chapter.

Being an economist, it is important to find a way to more efficiently utilize office hours and maximize student understanding. For instance, I started asking students to email me to schedule a meeting during office hours. This allows me to be more prepared for them and target their needs.

In my preparation for the meeting, I could look up the homework scores in Sapling Learning and click on the score in the grade book to see detail of the student's work. Many times, the reality was that we could focus our meeting on specific questions to address the problematic areas.

With Sapling Learning, I can get the overall homework score and view each attempt that the student made on each question. It became increasingly helpful to walk through several of these with individual students, asking them specifics to gauge understanding and further remedy their knowledge of the content.

The outcome is a more efficient use of my time during office hours with the ability to focus the student in areas of importance as opposed to a general high-level review. With the student present, we could address the content, improve understanding and then spend some time getting to understand their interests.

Once I know a bit more about the student, these interests can be incorporated into lectures, class discussions and projects to further engage the student in the overall economics subject material. This created a winning situation for both of us.

Viewing student attempts in Sapling Learning: do it yourself or email your Tech TA to learn how

1. Go to the grades icon on the main page, left side

2. The grader report will open with all student showing, then click on a student score

3. Now you will see one student’s assignment and each question in the assignment

4. Click on a quick number at the far left, this will allow you to see all attempts for that question

The example below shows Linus Pauling’s assignment. Question 2 is showing with each of his 5 attempts. Click the incorrect or correct tabs at the top of the question to view each attempt.

Outcomes